2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158053
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Promotion and Protection Practices Used by Mothers of Mexican Origin
Abstract:
Health Promotion and Protection Practices Used by Mothers of Mexican Origin
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Gallagher, Martina, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Contact Address:4707 12th Avenue NE, #301, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-6655
Purpose: The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore and describe the child health promotion and protection practices used by low-income, Spanish-speaking Mexican mothers living in San Antonio, Texas. Background: The Latino population of the United States comprises more than 35 million people, about 12.5% of the national population. It is estimated that by the year 2020 one in five children living in the U.S. will be of Latino descent. The largest subgroup in this growing minority is composed of individuals who are of Mexican origin. The literature shows that due to multiple contextual factors (e.g., poverty, lack of access to healthcare, language barriers, and violence in the community), children of Mexican descent generally experience a great number of health disparities. These factors lead to preventable pain and suffering, premature death, chronic disease, increased societal cost and use of resources, and even multigenerational transmission of morbidity. There is a major knowledge gap concerning current health promotion and health protection practices used by mothers of Mexican descent with their children. Understanding how mothers of Mexican origin promote and protect the health of their preschool children is crucial for the creation of culturally specific health promotion and protection programs that address health disparities experienced by this vulnerable population. Methods: Ethnography was selected as a method because it would allow for a full exploration and description of the phenomenon of interest. A total of nine participants were recruited from a community center in the South of Texas. Data collection in the form of ethnographic interviews and participant observations took place in the participants' homes and during community activities. An adaptation of Spradley's Developmental Research Sequence guided data collection and analysis (1979). The bilingual/bicultural investigator conducted data collection and analysis in Spanish and translated findings into English for the purpose of dissemination. Results: Despite significant socioeconomic challenges, these mothers of Mexican origin promoted and protected the health of their preschool children by "al cuidado [taking care]" and being "al pendiente [mindfully aware]" of the balance of their children's bodies, minds and souls. They described a holistic perspective of health where the imbalance of one component would cause disharmony in the overall wellness of the preschool child. This group of mothers saw themselves as solely responsible for ensuring and restoring the balance of their children's bodies, minds and souls. This balance was viewed as imperative to children's wellness. Implications: Child health promotion and protection behaviors used by mothers of Mexican descent were geared towards the maintenance and restoration of the balance of their children's bodies, minds and souls. The strength of this holistic perspective is not often addressed in health promotion interventions for this population. This new understanding allows for the creation of culturally competent health promotion programs that can build on already existing maternal strengths. Funded by: NIH/NINR F31 NR008174.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Promotion and Protection Practices Used by Mothers of Mexican Originen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158053-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Promotion and Protection Practices Used by Mothers of Mexican Origin</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gallagher, Martina, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4707 12th Avenue NE, #301, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-6655</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mg26@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this ethnographic study was to explore and describe the child health promotion and protection practices used by low-income, Spanish-speaking Mexican mothers living in San Antonio, Texas. Background: The Latino population of the United States comprises more than 35 million people, about 12.5% of the national population. It is estimated that by the year 2020 one in five children living in the U.S. will be of Latino descent. The largest subgroup in this growing minority is composed of individuals who are of Mexican origin. The literature shows that due to multiple contextual factors (e.g., poverty, lack of access to healthcare, language barriers, and violence in the community), children of Mexican descent generally experience a great number of health disparities. These factors lead to preventable pain and suffering, premature death, chronic disease, increased societal cost and use of resources, and even multigenerational transmission of morbidity. There is a major knowledge gap concerning current health promotion and health protection practices used by mothers of Mexican descent with their children. Understanding how mothers of Mexican origin promote and protect the health of their preschool children is crucial for the creation of culturally specific health promotion and protection programs that address health disparities experienced by this vulnerable population. Methods: Ethnography was selected as a method because it would allow for a full exploration and description of the phenomenon of interest. A total of nine participants were recruited from a community center in the South of Texas. Data collection in the form of ethnographic interviews and participant observations took place in the participants' homes and during community activities. An adaptation of Spradley's Developmental Research Sequence guided data collection and analysis (1979). The bilingual/bicultural investigator conducted data collection and analysis in Spanish and translated findings into English for the purpose of dissemination. Results: Despite significant socioeconomic challenges, these mothers of Mexican origin promoted and protected the health of their preschool children by &quot;al cuidado [taking care]&quot; and being &quot;al pendiente [mindfully aware]&quot; of the balance of their children's bodies, minds and souls. They described a holistic perspective of health where the imbalance of one component would cause disharmony in the overall wellness of the preschool child. This group of mothers saw themselves as solely responsible for ensuring and restoring the balance of their children's bodies, minds and souls. This balance was viewed as imperative to children's wellness. Implications: Child health promotion and protection behaviors used by mothers of Mexican descent were geared towards the maintenance and restoration of the balance of their children's bodies, minds and souls. The strength of this holistic perspective is not often addressed in health promotion interventions for this population. This new understanding allows for the creation of culturally competent health promotion programs that can build on already existing maternal strengths. Funded by: NIH/NINR F31 NR008174.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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