2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158055
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Case Study: Post-Event Analysis of Rural Casualty Flow Effectiveness
Abstract:
A Case Study: Post-Event Analysis of Rural Casualty Flow Effectiveness
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Glow, Steve, RN, MSN, FNP, CEN, EMT-P
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Adjunct Assistant Professor
Contact Address:32 Campus Drive 7416, Missoula, MT, 59801-7416, USA
Contact Telephone:406-243-2536
Co-Authors:Sandra W. Kuntz, PhD, RN
Purpose/Aims: The National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program, funded through HRSA CFDA 93.889 from Section 319C-1 of the Public Health Service Act and administered by Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, was established to enhance the ability of hospitals and health care systems to prepare for, and respond to, bioterrorism and other public health emergencies. Some much needed, albeit minimal, funding reached small rural hospitals in the past few years to bolster the development of internal disaster plans, establish links with external county/emergency service plans, and educate staff regarding Hospital Emergency Incident Command Systems (HEICS). Frontier/rural communities often consist primarily of a volunteer workforce of emergency responders who commit to protect their community through 24/7 availability and unpaid training activities. The emergency responder at the site of a multiple car accident, a house fire, or a chemical spill may be a local teacher, rancher, or office worker. The primary aim of this case study was to examine the details of an actual event: the collapse of a deck at a popular eating/drinking establishment in a rural, western Montana town. Methods: Case study research methods (Yin, 1994) were applied to answer descriptive and exploratory questions related to the observations of first responders and others involved in this incident. Was the emergency response effective? How well did the dispatch communication between first responders and hospital personnel work? How might casualty flow between the incident site and the hospital emergency room be improved? Data was collected through an operational debriefing, a system of collecting specific data through interviews with key providers on all sides of the incident. The researcher examined timelines, radio communication, and responder observations to capture lessons learned. Results: Reconstruction of the event from the point of view of volunteer firefighters, emergency response crews, and hospital personnel uncovered opportunities for improving future disaster response. Approximately 100 people were on the 15 x 60 foot deck when it collapsed. Personnel including paid and volunteer members of response organizations established an emergency triage staging area for victims using the START triage system and routed the most seriously injured to two rural hospitals. The first dispatch triggered the hospital disaster plan and implementation of HEICS. The strengths and weaknesses of the response were captured during the operational debriefing and include an examination of triage concordance between pre-hospital and hospital sectors, transport decision making, communications, and command and control issues. Implications: Health service infrastructure improvement (capacity) is best evaluated through the examination of simulated or actual events to determine capability (performance). The study of actual events identifies strengths (to be maintained and built upon) and areas for improvement. Using the operational debriefing format helps gather critical observations made by key personnel during a specific time-framed event. Reference: Yin, R. (1994). Case study research: Design and Methods (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Case Study: Post-Event Analysis of Rural Casualty Flow Effectivenessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158055-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Case Study: Post-Event Analysis of Rural Casualty Flow Effectiveness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Glow, Steve, RN, MSN, FNP, CEN, EMT-P</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">32 Campus Drive 7416, Missoula, MT, 59801-7416, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-243-2536</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sglow@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra W. Kuntz, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program, funded through HRSA CFDA 93.889 from Section 319C-1 of the Public Health Service Act and administered by Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, was established to enhance the ability of hospitals and health care systems to prepare for, and respond to, bioterrorism and other public health emergencies. Some much needed, albeit minimal, funding reached small rural hospitals in the past few years to bolster the development of internal disaster plans, establish links with external county/emergency service plans, and educate staff regarding Hospital Emergency Incident Command Systems (HEICS). Frontier/rural communities often consist primarily of a volunteer workforce of emergency responders who commit to protect their community through 24/7 availability and unpaid training activities. The emergency responder at the site of a multiple car accident, a house fire, or a chemical spill may be a local teacher, rancher, or office worker. The primary aim of this case study was to examine the details of an actual event: the collapse of a deck at a popular eating/drinking establishment in a rural, western Montana town. Methods: Case study research methods (Yin, 1994) were applied to answer descriptive and exploratory questions related to the observations of first responders and others involved in this incident. Was the emergency response effective? How well did the dispatch communication between first responders and hospital personnel work? How might casualty flow between the incident site and the hospital emergency room be improved? Data was collected through an operational debriefing, a system of collecting specific data through interviews with key providers on all sides of the incident. The researcher examined timelines, radio communication, and responder observations to capture lessons learned. Results: Reconstruction of the event from the point of view of volunteer firefighters, emergency response crews, and hospital personnel uncovered opportunities for improving future disaster response. Approximately 100 people were on the 15 x 60 foot deck when it collapsed. Personnel including paid and volunteer members of response organizations established an emergency triage staging area for victims using the START triage system and routed the most seriously injured to two rural hospitals. The first dispatch triggered the hospital disaster plan and implementation of HEICS. The strengths and weaknesses of the response were captured during the operational debriefing and include an examination of triage concordance between pre-hospital and hospital sectors, transport decision making, communications, and command and control issues. Implications: Health service infrastructure improvement (capacity) is best evaluated through the examination of simulated or actual events to determine capability (performance). The study of actual events identifies strengths (to be maintained and built upon) and areas for improvement. Using the operational debriefing format helps gather critical observations made by key personnel during a specific time-framed event. Reference: Yin, R. (1994). Case study research: Design and Methods (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:27:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:27:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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