2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158058
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Role Transitions: What Drives Staff Nurses to NP Programs?
Abstract:
Nurse Role Transitions: What Drives Staff Nurses to NP Programs?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hagedorn, Susan, RN, PhD, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado at Denver/HSC
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1024 Cook Street, Denver, CO, 80206, USA
Contact Telephone:303-315-8139
Introduction: Numerous studies have been done to elucidate why registered nurses, particularly young nurses, leave positions in acute care settings (Andrews & Dzieglelewske, 2005). Decreased staffing, lack of autonomy, limited salaries, required overtime and job dissatisfaction have been reported in the literature. At the same time, an increased number of registered nurses are applying to graduate programs, particularly nurse practitioner programs. Scant information is available to document why these registered nurses enter nurse practitioner programs, how the nurses' prior experiences affect their decisions, and the effect of nurses' decision to transition into nurse practitioner roles affects acute care settings.
Purpose and Sample: The purpose of this study is to identify why registered nurses are seeking graduate education with a nurse practitioner focus. Graduate nursing students, with and without acute care experience, will be recruited during the first year of their graduate program. Traditional Master's students, with staff nurse experience, and DNP students, with no staff nurse experience, will be included in the sample.
Method: A qualitative descriptive method will be used to gather data. Five focus groups will be conducted with first year family, adult, woman's health care, geriatric, and pediatric nurse practitioner students from the traditional MS and the DNP programs. Participants will complete a demographic information sheet that describes past educational experiences and previous clinical practice experiences. Focus group questions will be include attitudes about previous clinical employment experiences, expectations of the nurse practitioner role, why and how they chose their clinical specialty, thoughts about what might have made their acute care experience more satisfying and the effect of their decision to transition into the nurse practitioner role might affect the acute care setting. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics will be utilized to describe the sample. Audiotapes will be made of each focus group, transcribed and analyzed by the researchers using a constant comparative method.
Study Importance: This study will increase knowledge of reasons why staff nurses leave acute care settings for the nurse practitioner role, expectations graduate students have of the nurse practitioner role, and perceptions of how acute care settings could be changed to retain experienced staff nurses. Reference: Andrews, D. R. & Dzieglelewski, S. F. (2005). The nurse manager: Job satisfaction, the nursing shortage and retention. Journal of Nursing Management, 13(4), 286-295.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Role Transitions: What Drives Staff Nurses to NP Programs?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158058-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Role Transitions: What Drives Staff Nurses to NP Programs?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hagedorn, Susan, RN, PhD, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado at Denver/HSC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1024 Cook Street, Denver, CO, 80206, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303-315-8139</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sue.hagedorn@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Numerous studies have been done to elucidate why registered nurses, particularly young nurses, leave positions in acute care settings (Andrews &amp; Dzieglelewske, 2005). Decreased staffing, lack of autonomy, limited salaries, required overtime and job dissatisfaction have been reported in the literature. At the same time, an increased number of registered nurses are applying to graduate programs, particularly nurse practitioner programs. Scant information is available to document why these registered nurses enter nurse practitioner programs, how the nurses' prior experiences affect their decisions, and the effect of nurses' decision to transition into nurse practitioner roles affects acute care settings.<br/> Purpose and Sample: The purpose of this study is to identify why registered nurses are seeking graduate education with a nurse practitioner focus. Graduate nursing students, with and without acute care experience, will be recruited during the first year of their graduate program. Traditional Master's students, with staff nurse experience, and DNP students, with no staff nurse experience, will be included in the sample. <br/>Method: A qualitative descriptive method will be used to gather data. Five focus groups will be conducted with first year family, adult, woman's health care, geriatric, and pediatric nurse practitioner students from the traditional MS and the DNP programs. Participants will complete a demographic information sheet that describes past educational experiences and previous clinical practice experiences. Focus group questions will be include attitudes about previous clinical employment experiences, expectations of the nurse practitioner role, why and how they chose their clinical specialty, thoughts about what might have made their acute care experience more satisfying and the effect of their decision to transition into the nurse practitioner role might affect the acute care setting. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics will be utilized to describe the sample. Audiotapes will be made of each focus group, transcribed and analyzed by the researchers using a constant comparative method. <br/>Study Importance: This study will increase knowledge of reasons why staff nurses leave acute care settings for the nurse practitioner role, expectations graduate students have of the nurse practitioner role, and perceptions of how acute care settings could be changed to retain experienced staff nurses. Reference: Andrews, D. R. &amp; Dzieglelewski, S. F. (2005). The nurse manager: Job satisfaction, the nursing shortage and retention. Journal of Nursing Management, 13(4), 286-295.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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