2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158064
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal Worry as a Inverse Correlate of Self-Efficacy
Abstract:
Maternal Worry as a Inverse Correlate of Self-Efficacy
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hendrickson, Sherry, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701, USA
Contact Telephone:512-471-9079
Co-Authors:Jacquelyn Williams, PhD, APRN
Purpose: This presentation discusses the development of a 10-item Spanish-language maternal worry instrument and the relationship of the measure to self-efficacy for home safety behaviors within a home visit study. Background: Research on parental worry related to injury prevention is minimal and almost nonexistent involving minority women and home visits. This tool measures maternal worry about commonly occurring injuries to preschool age children. Discussion of the issue or concepts/variables of interest: It was anticipated that those mothers with higher worry scores would be more vigilant and would demonstrate higher self-efficacy scores for home safety behaviors. Early, classic work of Janis' (1958) discusses the "work of worrying" and Lazarus (1984, 2000) discusses avoidance as a mechanism for coping with worry. Methods: The tool was created by the primary author, and screened by promotoras for appropriate language, and feedback on administration. It was piloted with 56 monolingual, Spanish-speaking mothers, mostly of Mexican origin, with 28 in the comparison and 28 in the treatment groups. These women were served by agencies in Las Cruces, New Mexico and Austin, Texas. Mothers were randomized to one of two groups, maintaining allocation concealment. The experimental group received a home safety intervention. The controlled group received an equal-attention visit on preschool readiness. Delivered at Visit 2, the visit intervention lasted approximately one hour. Results: The Cronbach alpha for the newly created worry instrument is .84. An inverse relationship was demonstrated between maternal worry about household hazards & perceived self-efficacy for home safety behaviors. Implications: When worry occurs in the absence of the mother's ability to cope effectively, nursing needs a way to assess this situation, support increasing maternal self-efficacy and collaborate with mothers to improve the health of their children in a culturally-appropriate manner. Home visits about safety may make mothers feel more confident and may produce less worry even if receiving an equal-attention, non-intervention visit. Increased maternal worry was not correlated with mothers' perception of their ability to keep their children safe, so decreasing worry seems a desirable goal. Funding: Received through NIH, NINR funding which created the Southwest Partnership Center, the distributor of these research monies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal Worry as a Inverse Correlate of Self-Efficacyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158064-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal Worry as a Inverse Correlate of Self-Efficacy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hendrickson, Sherry, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">512-471-9079</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sherryh@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacquelyn Williams, PhD, APRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation discusses the development of a 10-item Spanish-language maternal worry instrument and the relationship of the measure to self-efficacy for home safety behaviors within a home visit study. Background: Research on parental worry related to injury prevention is minimal and almost nonexistent involving minority women and home visits. This tool measures maternal worry about commonly occurring injuries to preschool age children. Discussion of the issue or concepts/variables of interest: It was anticipated that those mothers with higher worry scores would be more vigilant and would demonstrate higher self-efficacy scores for home safety behaviors. Early, classic work of Janis' (1958) discusses the &quot;work of worrying&quot; and Lazarus (1984, 2000) discusses avoidance as a mechanism for coping with worry. Methods: The tool was created by the primary author, and screened by promotoras for appropriate language, and feedback on administration. It was piloted with 56 monolingual, Spanish-speaking mothers, mostly of Mexican origin, with 28 in the comparison and 28 in the treatment groups. These women were served by agencies in Las Cruces, New Mexico and Austin, Texas. Mothers were randomized to one of two groups, maintaining allocation concealment. The experimental group received a home safety intervention. The controlled group received an equal-attention visit on preschool readiness. Delivered at Visit 2, the visit intervention lasted approximately one hour. Results: The Cronbach alpha for the newly created worry instrument is .84. An inverse relationship was demonstrated between maternal worry about household hazards &amp; perceived self-efficacy for home safety behaviors. Implications: When worry occurs in the absence of the mother's ability to cope effectively, nursing needs a way to assess this situation, support increasing maternal self-efficacy and collaborate with mothers to improve the health of their children in a culturally-appropriate manner. Home visits about safety may make mothers feel more confident and may produce less worry even if receiving an equal-attention, non-intervention visit. Increased maternal worry was not correlated with mothers' perception of their ability to keep their children safe, so decreasing worry seems a desirable goal. Funding: Received through NIH, NINR funding which created the Southwest Partnership Center, the distributor of these research monies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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