2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158066
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress and Psychological Distress in Women with IBS and Controls
Abstract:
Stress and Psychological Distress in Women with IBS and Controls
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hertig, Vicky, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:2146 N. 87th St., Seattle, WA, 98103, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-7431
Co-Authors:Kevin Cain, PhD; Monica Jarrett, PhD, RN; and Margaret Heitkemper, PhD, RN
Background: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by symptoms of abdominal discomfort and pain that is associated with changes in bowel habits. Individuals with IBS report that stress initiates and/or exacerbates bowel symptoms. Determination of treatment modalities requires understanding the role of stress and psychological distress in the symptom experience of IBS. Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare self-reports of stress and psychological distress in women with and without IBS. Sample: The sample was made up of women with IBS (n = 206) and controls (n = 54) ranging in age from 18-49. IBS subjects were divided into subgroups based on predominant bowel pattern (constipation, n = 55; diarrhea, n = 71; alternating, n = 65) for further analysis. Methods: Self-reports of stress were measured retrospectively by scores from the Daily Hassles Scale and prospectively through responses given to four stress questions in a daily symptom diary. Psychological distress was measured by the global severity index and subscale scores of anxiety and depression from the Symptom Checklist-90R. Results: IBS subjects overall endorsed significantly more total hassles (p < 0.001), more frequency of hassles (p < 0.001) and greater severity of hassles (p < 0.001) than control subjects. There was no significant difference between IBS subjects and controls in response to the diary question "How stressful was your day?" IBS subjects did, however, have higher stress scores compared to control subjects on questions related to stressful relationships with others (p = 0.006), stressful parenting (p = 0.010), and stressful job or school (p = 0.034). Among the IBS subgroups, IBS-alternating had higher levels of stress than other subgroups due to their relationships with others (p = 0.024) and trending toward higher stress of job or school (p = 0.095). On the Symptom Checklist-90R, IBS subjects overall had higher scores for depression (p < 0.001), anxiety (p < 0.001) and a higher global severity index (p < 0.001) than control subjects. There was no significant difference in scores among the IBS subgroups on the anxiety and depression subscales, nor on the overall global severity index. Conclusions: The finding that IBS subjects reported more stress and psychological distress than control subjects is consistent with reports in the literature. The finding that subjects in the IBS-alternating subgroup reported the highest means in stressful relationships, stressful job or school, and stressful day compared to other IBS subgroups is interesting. The uncertainty of not knowing what symptoms to expect may increase perception of stress. Interventions aimed at reducing stress and psychological distress are warranted in patients with IBS. Particular strategies may need to take into account the perceived origin of the stress along with bowel predominant subgroup. Funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, NR07039, NR04101, NR04142.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress and Psychological Distress in Women with IBS and Controlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158066-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stress and Psychological Distress in Women with IBS and Controls</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hertig, Vicky, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2146 N. 87th St., Seattle, WA, 98103, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-7431</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vhertig@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kevin Cain, PhD; Monica Jarrett, PhD, RN; and Margaret Heitkemper, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by symptoms of abdominal discomfort and pain that is associated with changes in bowel habits. Individuals with IBS report that stress initiates and/or exacerbates bowel symptoms. Determination of treatment modalities requires understanding the role of stress and psychological distress in the symptom experience of IBS. Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare self-reports of stress and psychological distress in women with and without IBS. Sample: The sample was made up of women with IBS (n = 206) and controls (n = 54) ranging in age from 18-49. IBS subjects were divided into subgroups based on predominant bowel pattern (constipation, n = 55; diarrhea, n = 71; alternating, n = 65) for further analysis. Methods: Self-reports of stress were measured retrospectively by scores from the Daily Hassles Scale and prospectively through responses given to four stress questions in a daily symptom diary. Psychological distress was measured by the global severity index and subscale scores of anxiety and depression from the Symptom Checklist-90R. Results: IBS subjects overall endorsed significantly more total hassles (p &lt; 0.001), more frequency of hassles (p &lt; 0.001) and greater severity of hassles (p &lt; 0.001) than control subjects. There was no significant difference between IBS subjects and controls in response to the diary question &quot;How stressful was your day?&quot; IBS subjects did, however, have higher stress scores compared to control subjects on questions related to stressful relationships with others (p = 0.006), stressful parenting (p = 0.010), and stressful job or school (p = 0.034). Among the IBS subgroups, IBS-alternating had higher levels of stress than other subgroups due to their relationships with others (p = 0.024) and trending toward higher stress of job or school (p = 0.095). On the Symptom Checklist-90R, IBS subjects overall had higher scores for depression (p &lt; 0.001), anxiety (p &lt; 0.001) and a higher global severity index (p &lt; 0.001) than control subjects. There was no significant difference in scores among the IBS subgroups on the anxiety and depression subscales, nor on the overall global severity index. Conclusions: The finding that IBS subjects reported more stress and psychological distress than control subjects is consistent with reports in the literature. The finding that subjects in the IBS-alternating subgroup reported the highest means in stressful relationships, stressful job or school, and stressful day compared to other IBS subgroups is interesting. The uncertainty of not knowing what symptoms to expect may increase perception of stress. Interventions aimed at reducing stress and psychological distress are warranted in patients with IBS. Particular strategies may need to take into account the perceived origin of the stress along with bowel predominant subgroup. Funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research, NR07039, NR04101, NR04142.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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