2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158067
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preparing the Coming Healthcare Workforce for All-Hazard Events
Abstract:
Preparing the Coming Healthcare Workforce for All-Hazard Events
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hill, Wade, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University - Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 207 Sherrick Hall, PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59715, USA
Contact Telephone:406-994-4011
Co-Authors:Sandra W. Kuntz, PhD, RN; Jean C. Carter, PharmD, PhD; and Steven D. Glow, RN, MSN, FNP, CEN, EMT-P
Purpose/Aims: The nature of emerging and all-hazard public health issues requires innovative and nimble curricular approaches in order to prepare the coming public health workforce for 21st century practice. Packed health care curricula and slow-moving processes for curricular change create an opportunity to explore alternative ways of enhancing curricula with emerging issue topics (i.e. disaster/bioterrorism preparedness) while preserving essential discipline-based content. Members of an interdisciplinary project team (nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, medical technology, and technical programs in medical assisting, respiratory therapy, and pharmacy technician), linking faculty from four higher education institutions, collaborated to introduce basic disaster preparedness curricular enhancements to undergraduate health profession students.
Methods: First, the interdisciplinary/inter-institutional project team researched discipline-specific and public health preparedness competencies and developed a common language and appreciation of unique disaster roles among the represented health service disciplines. Next, the team decided on a curricular enhancement approach and designated program specific placement for core disaster content. Finally, the team collaborated to develop four basic disaster/bioterrorism modules (introduction; recognizing/reporting; safety, care, and treatment; and, organizing a response), a capstone multidisciplinary disaster simulation, and flexible content delivery methods. Results: Students from nursing (n=129), pharmacy (n=56), allied health (n=18) and faculty project participants contributed insights regarding the curricular enhancements from fall 2003 through spring 2005. An online module evaluation tool (SNAP software) was used to collect learning outcome measures (knowledge, skills, and attitude) and satisfaction (an optional activity) with the instructional delivery methods. Early results indicate favorable satisfaction scores modules 1-4 receiving mean (SD) ratings of 3.95 (0.64), 3.95 (0.57), 3.96 (0.6), 3.89 (0.56). When asked to rate the likelihood that the U.S. will experience a terrorism event in the near future, all except the physical therapy students thought it was highly likely or likely. Students said the likelihood that they will be asked to help in a response was not very high, but, if they were asked, they believed they would have the skills and abilities necessary to assist. Knowledge scores may be a less reliable predictor of success as some of the allied health groups did not require testing and/or allowed testing at different intervals. Implications: In addition to the quantitative results of this two year inter-institutional and interdisciplinary curricular enhancement project, qualitative summaries indicate promise for institutions wishing to work between and among health care disciplines. The methods and process utilized by this nursing, pharmacy, and allied health partnership may provide insight to other groups searching for ways to adopt all-hazard curricular content. This project was funded by HRSA through the BTCDP CFDA 93.996 initiative.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreparing the Coming Healthcare Workforce for All-Hazard Eventsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158067-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preparing the Coming Healthcare Workforce for All-Hazard Events</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill, Wade, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University - Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 207 Sherrick Hall, PO Box 173560, Bozeman, MT, 59715, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-994-4011</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">whill@montana.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra W. Kuntz, PhD, RN; Jean C. Carter, PharmD, PhD; and Steven D. Glow, RN, MSN, FNP, CEN, EMT-P</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: The nature of emerging and all-hazard public health issues requires innovative and nimble curricular approaches in order to prepare the coming public health workforce for 21st century practice. Packed health care curricula and slow-moving processes for curricular change create an opportunity to explore alternative ways of enhancing curricula with emerging issue topics (i.e. disaster/bioterrorism preparedness) while preserving essential discipline-based content. Members of an interdisciplinary project team (nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, medical technology, and technical programs in medical assisting, respiratory therapy, and pharmacy technician), linking faculty from four higher education institutions, collaborated to introduce basic disaster preparedness curricular enhancements to undergraduate health profession students.<br/>Methods: First, the interdisciplinary/inter-institutional project team researched discipline-specific and public health preparedness competencies and developed a common language and appreciation of unique disaster roles among the represented health service disciplines. Next, the team decided on a curricular enhancement approach and designated program specific placement for core disaster content. Finally, the team collaborated to develop four basic disaster/bioterrorism modules (introduction; recognizing/reporting; safety, care, and treatment; and, organizing a response), a capstone multidisciplinary disaster simulation, and flexible content delivery methods. Results: Students from nursing (n=129), pharmacy (n=56), allied health (n=18) and faculty project participants contributed insights regarding the curricular enhancements from fall 2003 through spring 2005. An online module evaluation tool (SNAP software) was used to collect learning outcome measures (knowledge, skills, and attitude) and satisfaction (an optional activity) with the instructional delivery methods. Early results indicate favorable satisfaction scores modules 1-4 receiving mean (SD) ratings of 3.95 (0.64), 3.95 (0.57), 3.96 (0.6), 3.89 (0.56). When asked to rate the likelihood that the U.S. will experience a terrorism event in the near future, all except the physical therapy students thought it was highly likely or likely. Students said the likelihood that they will be asked to help in a response was not very high, but, if they were asked, they believed they would have the skills and abilities necessary to assist. Knowledge scores may be a less reliable predictor of success as some of the allied health groups did not require testing and/or allowed testing at different intervals. Implications: In addition to the quantitative results of this two year inter-institutional and interdisciplinary curricular enhancement project, qualitative summaries indicate promise for institutions wishing to work between and among health care disciplines. The methods and process utilized by this nursing, pharmacy, and allied health partnership may provide insight to other groups searching for ways to adopt all-hazard curricular content. This project was funded by HRSA through the BTCDP CFDA 93.996 initiative.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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