2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158069
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Historical Stress and Ways American Indian Elders Manage Imbalance
Abstract:
Historical Stress and Ways American Indian Elders Manage Imbalance
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Ide, Bette, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA
Contact Telephone:701-777-4531
Co-Authors:Barbara K. Dahlen, MS, RN
Purpose/Aims: This pilot study identifies the components of historical stress in American Indian elders and examines the ways they manage imbalance in their lives. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The study combines the Dahlen Dream Catcher/Medicine Wheel model, which depicts the complexity of supports needed by elders, with the theory of social stress. The latter postulates that social incongruity increases the risk of disease. Disparities in health-illness levels and high poverty levels within the American Indian population are believed to be related to historical trauma or stress, "the cumulative wounding across generations as well as during one's current life span" (Weaver & Yellow Horse Brave Heart, 1999). Among the stresses Indian elders have identified are loss of language, culture, loss of respect, communication, multiple and emerging roles, being caregivers for their grandchildren, and losses that come with advancing age. Research evidence to support the contention that these stresses have affected their health status is scarce and scattered. Methods: A descriptive approach combines an oral history with quantitative measures of functioning and self-efficacy. A guided interview includes questions about historical events, how the elder has been affected by them, their personal history of changes and important events that have occurred, and how they manage today. The quantitative portion includes questions about their support network, perceived health status and chronic illness, and two scales previously tested with American Indian elders, the Iowa Self-Assessment Inventory and the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale. A snowball sample of 10 Turtle Mountain Chippewa elders aged 70 and older (considered old-old) is being interviewed. Descriptive statistics, bivariate correlations between scale scores, and t tests for differences according to sex will be used to analyze the quantitative data. A qualitative phenomenological approach will be used to yield initial themes from the oral histories. Results: Combining the qualitative and quantitative data, thematic analysis will be conducted in order to identify the major predictors of stress in these elders and the ways they have handled stressors. Implications: The study will add to the scant findings on the impact of historical stress on the health of American Indian elders. Through the process of cultural discovery, the knowledge gained from this study will lead to improved client care. Funding: University of North Dakota College of Nursing Research Grant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHistorical Stress and Ways American Indian Elders Manage Imbalanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158069-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Historical Stress and Ways American Indian Elders Manage Imbalance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ide, Bette, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701-777-4531</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">betteide@mail.und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara K. Dahlen, MS, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: This pilot study identifies the components of historical stress in American Indian elders and examines the ways they manage imbalance in their lives. Rationale/Conceptual Basis/Background: The study combines the Dahlen Dream Catcher/Medicine Wheel model, which depicts the complexity of supports needed by elders, with the theory of social stress. The latter postulates that social incongruity increases the risk of disease. Disparities in health-illness levels and high poverty levels within the American Indian population are believed to be related to historical trauma or stress, &quot;the cumulative wounding across generations as well as during one's current life span&quot; (Weaver &amp; Yellow Horse Brave Heart, 1999). Among the stresses Indian elders have identified are loss of language, culture, loss of respect, communication, multiple and emerging roles, being caregivers for their grandchildren, and losses that come with advancing age. Research evidence to support the contention that these stresses have affected their health status is scarce and scattered. Methods: A descriptive approach combines an oral history with quantitative measures of functioning and self-efficacy. A guided interview includes questions about historical events, how the elder has been affected by them, their personal history of changes and important events that have occurred, and how they manage today. The quantitative portion includes questions about their support network, perceived health status and chronic illness, and two scales previously tested with American Indian elders, the Iowa Self-Assessment Inventory and the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale. A snowball sample of 10 Turtle Mountain Chippewa elders aged 70 and older (considered old-old) is being interviewed. Descriptive statistics, bivariate correlations between scale scores, and t tests for differences according to sex will be used to analyze the quantitative data. A qualitative phenomenological approach will be used to yield initial themes from the oral histories. Results: Combining the qualitative and quantitative data, thematic analysis will be conducted in order to identify the major predictors of stress in these elders and the ways they have handled stressors. Implications: The study will add to the scant findings on the impact of historical stress on the health of American Indian elders. Through the process of cultural discovery, the knowledge gained from this study will lead to improved client care. Funding: University of North Dakota College of Nursing Research Grant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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