2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158070
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Association of Executive Function to Self-Management Capacity
Abstract:
The Association of Executive Function to Self-Management Capacity
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Insel, Kathleen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:5870 N. Camino del Conde, Tucson, AZ, 85718, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-6220
Co-Authors:Chao-pin Hsiao, MS, PhD (C)
Background: Cognitive processes, specifically executive function, have been demonstrated to be associated with disease severity and self-management in previous investigations among individuals with chronic disease other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The association of disease severity among individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is hypothesized to be associated with executive function and consequently with symptom self-management and self-management in the Meek Model of Symptom Self-Management in Chronic Disease as described in the overview. Purpose: The intent of this component of the investigation was to examine the interrelatedness of four assessments of executive function and two bedside measures of cognition. In addition we examined the association of a composite of executive function assessments and indicators of self-management including inhaler use. Methods: The sample has been described in the overview as presented by Dr. Paula Meek. The measures used to assess cognitive function include one bedside measure of executive function, the EXIT25 (Royall, Cordes, & Polk, 1997), the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) (Folstein, Folstein, & McHugh, 1975), the STROOP measure of inhibitory ability considered an executive function (Hentschel & Schubo, 1976), the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) (Heaton, Chelune, Talley, Kay, & Curtis, 1993) and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (Smith, 1982). Results: Four measures of executive function were standardized and correlations obtained. The measures include: STROOP interference score, categories achieved of the WCST, perseveration raw score of the WCST, and the total score achieved in the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. We also examined the association of the executive measures with standard bedside measures of cognition. The STROOP was highly associated only with performance on the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) whereas all other measures of cognitive function were significantly with each other. In preliminary analysis, a composite of the standardized measures of executive function demonstrated significant association with the bedside measures of executive function (EXIT25, r = -.41) and MMSE (r = .60). The executive composite was also significantly associated with the percentage of time an inhaler was correctly shaken prior to inhalation (r = .36). Implications: The STROOP, a measure of cognitive inhibitory function, appears to tap a cognitive process that differs significantly from other measures thought to assess executive function. In addition, the significant association of the composite of executive function with a self management activity suggests that executive function is implicated in the successful performance of self-management activities. A description of executive function and the processes thought to be involved in self-management will be offered. References: 1) Folstein, M. F., Folstein, S. E., & McHugh, P. R. (1975). "Mini-mental state". A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. Journal of Psychiatric Research., 12(3), 189-198. 2) Heaton, R. K., Chelune, G. J., Talley, J. L., Kay, G. G., & Curtis, G. (1993). Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) Manual Revised and Expanded. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources. 3) Hentschel, U., & Schubo, W. (1976). Serially scored color-, picture-, and figure-word tests, their intercorrelations and interpretation. (No. 0555-5620, Print): Psychological Laboratory, Lund University. 4) Royall, D. R., Cordes, J., & Polk, M. (1997). Executive control and the comprehension of medical information by elderly retirees. Experimental Aging Research., 23(4), 301-313. 5) Smith, A. (1982). Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Association of Executive Function to Self-Management Capacityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158070-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Association of Executive Function to Self-Management Capacity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Insel, Kathleen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5870 N. Camino del Conde, Tucson, AZ, 85718, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-6220</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">insel@nursing.arizona .edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chao-pin Hsiao, MS, PhD (C)</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Cognitive processes, specifically executive function, have been demonstrated to be associated with disease severity and self-management in previous investigations among individuals with chronic disease other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The association of disease severity among individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is hypothesized to be associated with executive function and consequently with symptom self-management and self-management in the Meek Model of Symptom Self-Management in Chronic Disease as described in the overview. Purpose: The intent of this component of the investigation was to examine the interrelatedness of four assessments of executive function and two bedside measures of cognition. In addition we examined the association of a composite of executive function assessments and indicators of self-management including inhaler use. Methods: The sample has been described in the overview as presented by Dr. Paula Meek. The measures used to assess cognitive function include one bedside measure of executive function, the EXIT25 (Royall, Cordes, &amp; Polk, 1997), the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) (Folstein, Folstein, &amp; McHugh, 1975), the STROOP measure of inhibitory ability considered an executive function (Hentschel &amp; Schubo, 1976), the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) (Heaton, Chelune, Talley, Kay, &amp; Curtis, 1993) and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (Smith, 1982). Results: Four measures of executive function were standardized and correlations obtained. The measures include: STROOP interference score, categories achieved of the WCST, perseveration raw score of the WCST, and the total score achieved in the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. We also examined the association of the executive measures with standard bedside measures of cognition. The STROOP was highly associated only with performance on the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) whereas all other measures of cognitive function were significantly with each other. In preliminary analysis, a composite of the standardized measures of executive function demonstrated significant association with the bedside measures of executive function (EXIT25, r = -.41) and MMSE (r = .60). The executive composite was also significantly associated with the percentage of time an inhaler was correctly shaken prior to inhalation (r = .36). Implications: The STROOP, a measure of cognitive inhibitory function, appears to tap a cognitive process that differs significantly from other measures thought to assess executive function. In addition, the significant association of the composite of executive function with a self management activity suggests that executive function is implicated in the successful performance of self-management activities. A description of executive function and the processes thought to be involved in self-management will be offered. References: 1) Folstein, M. F., Folstein, S. E., &amp; McHugh, P. R. (1975). &quot;Mini-mental state&quot;. A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. Journal of Psychiatric Research., 12(3), 189-198. 2) Heaton, R. K., Chelune, G. J., Talley, J. L., Kay, G. G., &amp; Curtis, G. (1993). Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) Manual Revised and Expanded. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources. 3) Hentschel, U., &amp; Schubo, W. (1976). Serially scored color-, picture-, and figure-word tests, their intercorrelations and interpretation. (No. 0555-5620, Print): Psychological Laboratory, Lund University. 4) Royall, D. R., Cordes, J., &amp; Polk, M. (1997). Executive control and the comprehension of medical information by elderly retirees. Experimental Aging Research., 23(4), 301-313. 5) Smith, A. (1982). Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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