2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158071
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Men With IBS Recruited From Internet or Community
Abstract:
Comparison of Men With IBS Recruited From Internet or Community
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2006
Author:Jarrett, Monica, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-2348
Co-Authors:Margaret Heitkemper, PhD, RN, FAAN
Background: Internet peer-to-peer communities have evolved over the last three decades. They provide an opportunity for individuals to share experiences, ask questions, and receive emotional support. Some of these communities have developed around specific disorders or diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and provide a form of self help. In addition, researchers have used internet communities to recruit otherwise hard to reach participants for studies. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if men who were recruited from a disease-specific support group differed from men recruited from the local community. Sample: Men (18-50 years) with a diagnosis of IBS and current gastrointestinal symptoms were recruited through community newspapers in the Pacific Northwest (IBS-C, n = 13), and through two internet organizations (IBS-I, n = 29, a national and pacific coast internet organization). Methods: Persons who met the eligibility criteria received orientation to the study, gave written consent, and completed a symptom diary for 2-3 weeks. Participants completed questionnaires that addressed demographics, IBS symptoms (Bowel Disease Questionnaire), psychological distress (symptom Checklist 90R), daily hassles (Daily Hassles), and disease-specific quality of life (IBS-Quality of Life). Results: The mean ages of the men were comparable (M ñ SD, IBS-I 36 ñ 9; IBS-C 35 ñ 10). They were predominantly White (IBS-I, 93%; IBS-C, 100%), married/partnered IBS-I, 55%; IBS-C, 54%), and had completed 4-yr college (IBS-I, 69%; IBS-C, 54%). The IBS-I men were more likely to have a professional/management job (72%) than the IBS-C (39%). A few of the men in the IBS-I group had jobs that required frequent travel. IBS symptoms such as severity of abdominal pain, frequency of pain episodes, length of time for pain episodes, and abdominal pain triggered by meals were similar in both groups. Men in the IBS-I group were more likely to report somatic symptoms (IBS-I, 0.60 ñ 0.53; IBS-C, 0.31 ñ 0.29, p = .028) and additional items (e.g., poor sleep quality, decreased appetite; IBS-I, 0.88 ñ 0.77; IBS-C, 0.33 ñ 0.34, p = .001). Neither the frequency nor intensity of hassles differed between groups or did the IBS-QOL. (Diary data will be reported at the time of the conference.) Conclusions: IBS is less common in men than women, and men can be hard to recruit from the community, as in this study. The internet provides an alterative approach to recruitment; however, men who use the internet may differ from those in the community. In this pilot study, the groups of men with IBS had similar responses to questions about symptoms. The small sample may obfuscate actual differences. Men with IBS who use the internet may actually be similar to men in the community but not able to find information that they need in their existing social networks or face-to-face situations. Funded by NINR-Shannon Award.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Men With IBS Recruited From Internet or Communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158071-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Men With IBS Recruited From Internet or Community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jarrett, Monica, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98195-7266, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-2348</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jarrett@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Heitkemper, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Internet peer-to-peer communities have evolved over the last three decades. They provide an opportunity for individuals to share experiences, ask questions, and receive emotional support. Some of these communities have developed around specific disorders or diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and provide a form of self help. In addition, researchers have used internet communities to recruit otherwise hard to reach participants for studies. Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if men who were recruited from a disease-specific support group differed from men recruited from the local community. Sample: Men (18-50 years) with a diagnosis of IBS and current gastrointestinal symptoms were recruited through community newspapers in the Pacific Northwest (IBS-C, n = 13), and through two internet organizations (IBS-I, n = 29, a national and pacific coast internet organization). Methods: Persons who met the eligibility criteria received orientation to the study, gave written consent, and completed a symptom diary for 2-3 weeks. Participants completed questionnaires that addressed demographics, IBS symptoms (Bowel Disease Questionnaire), psychological distress (symptom Checklist 90R), daily hassles (Daily Hassles), and disease-specific quality of life (IBS-Quality of Life). Results: The mean ages of the men were comparable (M &ntilde; SD, IBS-I 36 &ntilde; 9; IBS-C 35 &ntilde; 10). They were predominantly White (IBS-I, 93%; IBS-C, 100%), married/partnered IBS-I, 55%; IBS-C, 54%), and had completed 4-yr college (IBS-I, 69%; IBS-C, 54%). The IBS-I men were more likely to have a professional/management job (72%) than the IBS-C (39%). A few of the men in the IBS-I group had jobs that required frequent travel. IBS symptoms such as severity of abdominal pain, frequency of pain episodes, length of time for pain episodes, and abdominal pain triggered by meals were similar in both groups. Men in the IBS-I group were more likely to report somatic symptoms (IBS-I, 0.60 &ntilde; 0.53; IBS-C, 0.31 &ntilde; 0.29, p = .028) and additional items (e.g., poor sleep quality, decreased appetite; IBS-I, 0.88 &ntilde; 0.77; IBS-C, 0.33 &ntilde; 0.34, p = .001). Neither the frequency nor intensity of hassles differed between groups or did the IBS-QOL. (Diary data will be reported at the time of the conference.) Conclusions: IBS is less common in men than women, and men can be hard to recruit from the community, as in this study. The internet provides an alterative approach to recruitment; however, men who use the internet may differ from those in the community. In this pilot study, the groups of men with IBS had similar responses to questions about symptoms. The small sample may obfuscate actual differences. Men with IBS who use the internet may actually be similar to men in the community but not able to find information that they need in their existing social networks or face-to-face situations. Funded by NINR-Shannon Award.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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