2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158072
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Accessing Public Health Nurses’ Attitude toward Providing Palliative Care
Abstract:
Accessing Public Health Nurses’ Attitude toward Providing Palliative Care
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Chen, A.C.C.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington Human Services Policy Center,
Contact Address:Box 354804, 1107 NE 45th Street, Suite #205,, Seattle, , WA, 98105-4631, USA
Co-Authors:Hu, W Y
Culturally, one of life’s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of “a good death” is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients’ homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals frAB: Culturally, one of life’s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of “a good death” is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients’ homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals from local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses’ attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses’ attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (?2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention. Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care. om local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses’ attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses’ attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (c2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention.[1] Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAccessing Public Health Nurses’ Attitude toward Providing Palliative Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158072-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Accessing Public Health Nurses&rsquo; Attitude toward Providing Palliative Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, A.C.C.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington Human Services Policy Center,</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 354804, 1107 NE 45th Street, Suite #205,, Seattle, , WA, 98105-4631, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hu, W Y</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> Culturally, one of life&rsquo;s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of &ldquo;a good death&rdquo; is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients&rsquo; homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals frAB: Culturally, one of life&rsquo;s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of &ldquo;a good death&rdquo; is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients&rsquo; homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals from local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (?2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention. Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care. om local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (c2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention.[1] Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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