2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158073
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Theory-Testing of Social Context Influence on Adolescent Sexual Behaviors
Abstract:
A Theory-Testing of Social Context Influence on Adolescent Sexual Behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Chen, A.C.C.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington Human Services Policy Center,
Contact Address:Box 354804, 1107 NE 45th Street, Suite #205,, Seattle, , WA, 98105-4631, USA
Co-Authors:Thompson, E A
Adolescent risky sexual behavior (RSB) is a national and international concern because of the unwanted consequences that it may directly or indirectly influence adolescent physical and psychological heath, such as HIV/AIDS, or depression. In the US, a greater proportion of individuals aged 13-24 have HIV infection (13%) than AIDS (3%), strongly suggesting there has been no comparable decline in the newly diagnosed HIV among youth compared with AIDS incidence (CDC, 2003). This lack of decline argues for immediate and stronger prevention efforts. To understand adolescents’ sexual behaviors from a broader social context is crucial for preventive intervention. Purpose: This study tests a theory-driven model of risky sexual behavior among adolescents that incorporates social, family and peer contexts. Methods: A longitudinal design was used to predict risky sexual behavior across one year. The nationally representative sample was drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Variables reflecting the key concepts in the model were chosen from the In-Home Interview and Parent Interview. These indicators included (1) adolescent’s age, (2) family SES, (3) parental control, (4) parental disapproval of premarital sex, (5) parent-child communication about sex, (6) parent-child relationship, (7) perceived peer drug use, (8) Wave 1 risky sexual behavior. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the distributional properties of the posited exogenous and endogenous variables. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the measurement model prior to testing the posited theoretical model using structural equation modeling with MPLUS 2.14 allowing for adjustment of design effects. Results: Single adolescent males (n=3217) and females (n=3125) with weighted mean age at 16.46 (SE = .03) were included in model testing. The final model demonstrated a good fit to the data (c2(233)=4525.79; CFI = .92; RMSEA = .04). Parental disapproval of premarital sex, communication about sex, and Wave 1 RSB were significant predictors of Wave II RSB. Adolescent age also predicted wave II RSB indirectly through parental control and parent-child communication about sex. Family SES, parent-child relationship, and perceived peer drug use did not have significant direct or indirect effects on wave II RSB. Conclusions: The results suggested the critical influence of parents’ disapproval attitudes regarding premarital sex and communication about sexual related issues on the reduction of adolescent risky sexual behavior. The insignificant effects of family SES, parent-child relationship and perceived peer drug use was inconsistent with some previous studies. It may be that such an effect is gender specific and/or culturally sensitive. Thus, future research will focus on comparing the theoretical model across gender and ethnicity. Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective interventions by incorporating family components in promoting safe sex.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Theory-Testing of Social Context Influence on Adolescent Sexual Behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158073-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Theory-Testing of Social Context Influence on Adolescent Sexual Behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, A.C.C.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington Human Services Policy Center,</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 354804, 1107 NE 45th Street, Suite #205,, Seattle, , WA, 98105-4631, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Thompson, E A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescent risky sexual behavior (RSB) is a national and international concern because of the unwanted consequences that it may directly or indirectly influence adolescent physical and psychological heath, such as HIV/AIDS, or depression. In the US, a greater proportion of individuals aged 13-24 have HIV infection (13%) than AIDS (3%), strongly suggesting there has been no comparable decline in the newly diagnosed HIV among youth compared with AIDS incidence (CDC, 2003). This lack of decline argues for immediate and stronger prevention efforts. To understand adolescents&rsquo; sexual behaviors from a broader social context is crucial for preventive intervention. Purpose: This study tests a theory-driven model of risky sexual behavior among adolescents that incorporates social, family and peer contexts. Methods: A longitudinal design was used to predict risky sexual behavior across one year. The nationally representative sample was drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Variables reflecting the key concepts in the model were chosen from the In-Home Interview and Parent Interview. These indicators included (1) adolescent&rsquo;s age, (2) family SES, (3) parental control, (4) parental disapproval of premarital sex, (5) parent-child communication about sex, (6) parent-child relationship, (7) perceived peer drug use, (8) Wave 1 risky sexual behavior. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the distributional properties of the posited exogenous and endogenous variables. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the measurement model prior to testing the posited theoretical model using structural equation modeling with MPLUS 2.14 allowing for adjustment of design effects. Results: Single adolescent males (n=3217) and females (n=3125) with weighted mean age at 16.46 (SE = .03) were included in model testing. The final model demonstrated a good fit to the data (c2(233)=4525.79; CFI = .92; RMSEA = .04). Parental disapproval of premarital sex, communication about sex, and Wave 1 RSB were significant predictors of Wave II RSB. Adolescent age also predicted wave II RSB indirectly through parental control and parent-child communication about sex. Family SES, parent-child relationship, and perceived peer drug use did not have significant direct or indirect effects on wave II RSB. Conclusions: The results suggested the critical influence of parents&rsquo; disapproval attitudes regarding premarital sex and communication about sexual related issues on the reduction of adolescent risky sexual behavior. The insignificant effects of family SES, parent-child relationship and perceived peer drug use was inconsistent with some previous studies. It may be that such an effect is gender specific and/or culturally sensitive. Thus, future research will focus on comparing the theoretical model across gender and ethnicity. Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective interventions by incorporating family components in promoting safe sex.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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