2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158074
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses and Couples Perceptions of Caring and Empathy
Abstract:
Nurses and Couples Perceptions of Caring and Empathy
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Chen, Hsien-Tzu, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Unviersity of Washington
Contact Address:University of Washington, Dept. of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA
Co-Authors:Kristen Swanson, RN, PhD, FAAN
Purpose: to examine similarities and differences in the ways men and women rate nurse counselors as caring and empathetic and to determine the associations between nurses’ evaluations of counseling sessions and couples’ rating of nurse caring and empathy. Background: One goal of the Couples Miscarriage Healing Project (CMHP) is to examine the effectiveness of our caring-based nurse counseling sessions in promoting couples’ recovery after miscarriage. Swanson defines caring as a nurturing way of relating to a valued other towards whom one feels a personal sense of commitment and responsibility.[1] She claims there are five ways to convey caring: knowing (striving to understand the other); being with (offering emotional presence); doing for (doing for the other what they are unable to do for self); enabling (validating, supporting and informing); and maintaining belief (sustaining faith in the other’s ability to heal). In order to monitor the integrity of our application of the caring theory in the nurse counseling sessions, it was important to evaluate the nurses’ ability to counsel in a caring and empathetic manner. Methods: Data were available from the first counseling sessions with 47 couples. After each session nurses rated the intervention on an investigator developed, 10 item, 10-point, Likert-type scale. The nurse rated her own attentiveness (1 item), belief in the couple’s ability to come through the loss together (1 item), and her ability to relate to and believe in the man (4 items) and woman (4 items). Men and women rated their nurse as caring (using the total scale and two subscales, Competent Practitioner and Compassionate Healer from Swanson’s Caring Professional Scale) and as empathetic (Barrett-Lennard Empathy Scale). Descriptive analysis included paired t-tests, t-tests, and correlations. Findings: Men and women consistently rated their nurse counselors as highly caring, competent, compassionate, and empathetic. There were no differences in men and women’s ratings of their nurse counselors and no differences in how the two research nurses rated their counseling sessions. There were significant associations between male and female ratings of their nurses as caring (r=.31; p<.05); competent (r=.32; p<.01); and empathetic (r=.42; p<.01). Correlations between men’s and women’s rating of their nurse as compassionate were not significant. There was only one significant correlation between nurse ratings of sessions and men, women, or combined couples’ ratings of the nurse; that is, the nurse’s assessment of the couple’s ability to come through the loss together was correlated with the woman’s appraisal of the nurse as empathetic (r=.30; p<.05). Implications: This is an ongoing study. The small sample size may limit our ability to detect true differences in men and women’s perceptions of their nurse, and in our ability to detect associations between couples’ evaluations of the nurse and nurses’ rating of her own attentiveness, belief in the couple, and ability to relate to the man and woman. However, confirmation that men and women view their nurse in a similar fashion and that they both tend to rate the nurse as highly caring, compassionate, competent, and empathetic lends support to our claim that caring was delivered through the nurse counseling sessions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses and Couples Perceptions of Caring and Empathyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158074-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses and Couples Perceptions of Caring and Empathy </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Hsien-Tzu, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Unviersity of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Dept. of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kristen Swanson, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: to examine similarities and differences in the ways men and women rate nurse counselors as caring and empathetic and to determine the associations between nurses&rsquo; evaluations of counseling sessions and couples&rsquo; rating of nurse caring and empathy. Background: One goal of the Couples Miscarriage Healing Project (CMHP) is to examine the effectiveness of our caring-based nurse counseling sessions in promoting couples&rsquo; recovery after miscarriage. Swanson defines caring as a nurturing way of relating to a valued other towards whom one feels a personal sense of commitment and responsibility.[1] She claims there are five ways to convey caring: knowing (striving to understand the other); being with (offering emotional presence); doing for (doing for the other what they are unable to do for self); enabling (validating, supporting and informing); and maintaining belief (sustaining faith in the other&rsquo;s ability to heal). In order to monitor the integrity of our application of the caring theory in the nurse counseling sessions, it was important to evaluate the nurses&rsquo; ability to counsel in a caring and empathetic manner. Methods: Data were available from the first counseling sessions with 47 couples. After each session nurses rated the intervention on an investigator developed, 10 item, 10-point, Likert-type scale. The nurse rated her own attentiveness (1 item), belief in the couple&rsquo;s ability to come through the loss together (1 item), and her ability to relate to and believe in the man (4 items) and woman (4 items). Men and women rated their nurse as caring (using the total scale and two subscales, Competent Practitioner and Compassionate Healer from Swanson&rsquo;s Caring Professional Scale) and as empathetic (Barrett-Lennard Empathy Scale). Descriptive analysis included paired t-tests, t-tests, and correlations. Findings: Men and women consistently rated their nurse counselors as highly caring, competent, compassionate, and empathetic. There were no differences in men and women&rsquo;s ratings of their nurse counselors and no differences in how the two research nurses rated their counseling sessions. There were significant associations between male and female ratings of their nurses as caring (r=.31; p&lt;.05); competent (r=.32; p&lt;.01); and empathetic (r=.42; p&lt;.01). Correlations between men&rsquo;s and women&rsquo;s rating of their nurse as compassionate were not significant. There was only one significant correlation between nurse ratings of sessions and men, women, or combined couples&rsquo; ratings of the nurse; that is, the nurse&rsquo;s assessment of the couple&rsquo;s ability to come through the loss together was correlated with the woman&rsquo;s appraisal of the nurse as empathetic (r=.30; p&lt;.05). Implications: This is an ongoing study. The small sample size may limit our ability to detect true differences in men and women&rsquo;s perceptions of their nurse, and in our ability to detect associations between couples&rsquo; evaluations of the nurse and nurses&rsquo; rating of her own attentiveness, belief in the couple, and ability to relate to the man and woman. However, confirmation that men and women view their nurse in a similar fashion and that they both tend to rate the nurse as highly caring, compassionate, competent, and empathetic lends support to our claim that caring was delivered through the nurse counseling sessions. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:28:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:28:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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