2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158076
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dinnertime Visits And Videos: Methodological Challenges And Issues
Abstract:
Dinnertime Visits And Videos: Methodological Challenges And Issues
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Cooke, Cheryl , PhD, RN,
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:, Seattle, , WA
Co-Authors:Sybil Carrère, PhD; Anne Wheatley, MN, ARNP; Younhee Cho, BSN; Casilda Vigil, BSN; Kathleen Lange, MN, ARNP
Purpose: To explore the methodological issues and challenges during dinnertime data collection visits to families participating in a study of marriage, parenting, and child outcomes. Rationale and Methods: The families in this study are participating in up to 5 different methodological components, one which takes place at dinnertime. Families participating in the study are visited in their homes. Informed consent and assent is received, and an oral examination is conducted with the child of interest prior to collection of saliva for cortisol. Urinary and saliva endocrine collection procedures are explained to the child and his parent(s). Holter monitoring of several family members is done to collect heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia data during dinner. The dinner is videotaped while the nursing team waits in another room. Following dinner and with one parent present, the nurse completes a physical exam in order to Tanner stage the child which involves the child’s self-assessment of their current pubertal stage, and often, a conversation on puberty. The technician assists the other parent in completing a child health questionnaire. The family is paid for their time, and the team returns to the laboratory to download the Holter and questionnaire data, aliquot urine, and store urine and saliva samples. Discussion and Implications: Four basic areas of concern will be presented:1) Bio-behavioral methodological considerations in designing the procedures, 2) organization issues related to the visit, 3) staffing factors, and 4) considerations for parents and children during the home visit. Biobehavioral methodology issues concern circadian patterns in endocrine measures, invasive nature of measurement, and properly indexing the variables of interest. Organization issues include timing the visit; consideration of other family commitments, and potential burnout and attrition related to the multiple demands on a family that is part of a large study. Staffing issues involve selecting and training adequate and competent staff that is committed to the research process and scientific rigor. Family and child issues include coercion by parents for child participation, Tanner staging issues, parental concerns regarding conversations about puberty, and the involvement of other children in the home during the time of the visit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDinnertime Visits And Videos: Methodological Challenges And Issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158076-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dinnertime Visits And Videos: Methodological Challenges And Issues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cooke, Cheryl , PhD, RN,</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Seattle, , WA </td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sybil Carr&egrave;re, PhD; Anne Wheatley, MN, ARNP; Younhee Cho, BSN; Casilda Vigil, BSN; Kathleen Lange, MN, ARNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore the methodological issues and challenges during dinnertime data collection visits to families participating in a study of marriage, parenting, and child outcomes. Rationale and Methods: The families in this study are participating in up to 5 different methodological components, one which takes place at dinnertime. Families participating in the study are visited in their homes. Informed consent and assent is received, and an oral examination is conducted with the child of interest prior to collection of saliva for cortisol. Urinary and saliva endocrine collection procedures are explained to the child and his parent(s). Holter monitoring of several family members is done to collect heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia data during dinner. The dinner is videotaped while the nursing team waits in another room. Following dinner and with one parent present, the nurse completes a physical exam in order to Tanner stage the child which involves the child&rsquo;s self-assessment of their current pubertal stage, and often, a conversation on puberty. The technician assists the other parent in completing a child health questionnaire. The family is paid for their time, and the team returns to the laboratory to download the Holter and questionnaire data, aliquot urine, and store urine and saliva samples. Discussion and Implications: Four basic areas of concern will be presented:1) Bio-behavioral methodological considerations in designing the procedures, 2) organization issues related to the visit, 3) staffing factors, and 4) considerations for parents and children during the home visit. Biobehavioral methodology issues concern circadian patterns in endocrine measures, invasive nature of measurement, and properly indexing the variables of interest. Organization issues include timing the visit; consideration of other family commitments, and potential burnout and attrition related to the multiple demands on a family that is part of a large study. Staffing issues involve selecting and training adequate and competent staff that is committed to the research process and scientific rigor. Family and child issues include coercion by parents for child participation, Tanner staging issues, parental concerns regarding conversations about puberty, and the involvement of other children in the home during the time of the visit. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:29:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:29:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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