2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158081
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Storytelling as Healing: Pilot Testing of the Recollective Pathway Toolkit
Abstract:
Storytelling as Healing: Pilot Testing of the Recollective Pathway Toolkit
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Evans, B.
P.I. Institution Name:Washington State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, W. 2917 Ft. Geogre Wright Dr, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA
Co-Authors:Crogan, N L; Bendel, R
Purposes/Aims: Currently, elements of group support actually contributing to improved psychosocial and symptom outcomes in cancer survivors are essentially unknown. The purpose of this study was to measure effects of a nurse-led support group intervention on such patients’ mood, stress, coping, pain, selfefficacy, satisfaction with life, symptom reports, and level of health care utilization. Specific aims were to document psychosocial and symptom outcomes of the intervention, and test the intervention protocol (Recollective Pathway Toolkit) with cancer survivors and a trained oncology nurse who helped participants find personal meaning in the cancer experience. Background: Use of story as a way to explore meaning, and its potential effect on clinical outcomes and educational outcomes, has been well documented by authors such as Liehr & Smith (2000), Cohen, Kahn, & Steeves (1998), and Diekelmann (2001). In addition to this literature, this study was grounded in the use of story in medicine (Greenhalgh & Hurwitz, 1999) and the role of behavioral and psychosocial interventions on quality of life for persons with cancer (Burish, 2000; Spiegel, 1998; ten Kroode, 1998). Methods: Originally designed as a Solomon Four-Group with 48 patients, HIPAA effects on recruitment within a prescribed funding period led to a convenience sample of 10 mixed diagnosis cancer survivors who were randomly assigned to a pretest-posttest control group design that used six quantitative instruments, interviews, chart reviews, and nursing assessments to measure outcomes following a storytelling intervention. Results: Interview analysis revealed that the oncology nurse was able to effectively implement the Toolkit as taught (e.g. self-disclosing behaviors, exploration of the personal narrative of illness vs. reliance on the medical narrative). No physical symptom improvement was noted on nursing assessments or chart reviews; history of anxiety and/or depression in two patients was the sole psychosocial issue addressed in medical records. Health care utilization increased in one person with a disease recurrence. A repeated measures analysis of variance comparing changes in the two group means revealed significant differences (p < 0.10) only in the Index of Clinical Stress, p = 0.06. For the control group, the stress level increased from 21.3 to 28.0 while the stress level of the intervention group decreased from 36.8 to 21.6 (assumption of normality was tenable). Implications: Because patient groups for behavioral and psychosocial intervention testing are usually small, as in this study, confidence in results and generalizability are limited. Now that HIPAA has stabilized, the study should be extended to a larger sample, thereby increasing power, to further test the Toolkit as a basis for the nurse-led storytelling intervention, particularly in rural settings where other support groups may be unavailable. This study was supported by American Cancer Society/WSU Institutional Grant #13L-2843-0132.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStorytelling as Healing: Pilot Testing of the Recollective Pathway Toolkiten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158081-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Storytelling as Healing: Pilot Testing of the Recollective Pathway Toolkit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evans, B.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, W. 2917 Ft. Geogre Wright Dr, Spokane, WA, 99224, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Crogan, N L; Bendel, R</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: Currently, elements of group support actually contributing to improved psychosocial and symptom outcomes in cancer survivors are essentially unknown. The purpose of this study was to measure effects of a nurse-led support group intervention on such patients&rsquo; mood, stress, coping, pain, selfefficacy, satisfaction with life, symptom reports, and level of health care utilization. Specific aims were to document psychosocial and symptom outcomes of the intervention, and test the intervention protocol (Recollective Pathway Toolkit) with cancer survivors and a trained oncology nurse who helped participants find personal meaning in the cancer experience. Background: Use of story as a way to explore meaning, and its potential effect on clinical outcomes and educational outcomes, has been well documented by authors such as Liehr &amp; Smith (2000), Cohen, Kahn, &amp; Steeves (1998), and Diekelmann (2001). In addition to this literature, this study was grounded in the use of story in medicine (Greenhalgh &amp; Hurwitz, 1999) and the role of behavioral and psychosocial interventions on quality of life for persons with cancer (Burish, 2000; Spiegel, 1998; ten Kroode, 1998). Methods: Originally designed as a Solomon Four-Group with 48 patients, HIPAA effects on recruitment within a prescribed funding period led to a convenience sample of 10 mixed diagnosis cancer survivors who were randomly assigned to a pretest-posttest control group design that used six quantitative instruments, interviews, chart reviews, and nursing assessments to measure outcomes following a storytelling intervention. Results: Interview analysis revealed that the oncology nurse was able to effectively implement the Toolkit as taught (e.g. self-disclosing behaviors, exploration of the personal narrative of illness vs. reliance on the medical narrative). No physical symptom improvement was noted on nursing assessments or chart reviews; history of anxiety and/or depression in two patients was the sole psychosocial issue addressed in medical records. Health care utilization increased in one person with a disease recurrence. A repeated measures analysis of variance comparing changes in the two group means revealed significant differences (p &lt; 0.10) only in the Index of Clinical Stress, p = 0.06. For the control group, the stress level increased from 21.3 to 28.0 while the stress level of the intervention group decreased from 36.8 to 21.6 (assumption of normality was tenable). Implications: Because patient groups for behavioral and psychosocial intervention testing are usually small, as in this study, confidence in results and generalizability are limited. Now that HIPAA has stabilized, the study should be extended to a larger sample, thereby increasing power, to further test the Toolkit as a basis for the nurse-led storytelling intervention, particularly in rural settings where other support groups may be unavailable. This study was supported by American Cancer Society/WSU Institutional Grant #13L-2843-0132.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:29:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:29:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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