2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158082
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Maternal Acculturation and Food Insecurity
Abstract:
The Relationship of Maternal Acculturation and Food Insecurity
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Gallagher, Martina
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Scienct Center at San Antonio
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio , TX, 78210, USA
Co-Authors:Lori Noyola; Elizabeth Reifsnider
Objective: Acculturation refers to the changes in attitudes, values and behaviors that result from contact between two distinct cultures. Food insecurity (lacking sufficient food for health and growth) in a home has been show to influence the growth of children. Studies have shown both positive and negative influences of acculturation on Hispanic health behaviors. Little is known of the relationship between maternal acculturation and food insecurity. The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to examine the relationship between maternal acculturation and food insecurity for children. Methods: A secondary analysis was performed on data collected on a study that examined the causes of obesity among Mexican-American toddlers and preschoolers in WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children). Sample size was 375 mother/child dyads. Participants for the study are all enrolled in the WIC program and receive supplemental food and nutrition education. Variables analyzed were maternal acculturation level, as measured by the Acculturation Scale for Mexican Americans, and questionnaire items related to food insecurity for children. Maternal acculturation was scored so a higher score indicated acculturation to a dominant US culture, and a lower score indicated a Mexican cultural view. Results: The variables positively correlated to maternal acculturation were maternal work status and financial stress. Variables negatively correlated with maternal acculturation were breast feeding up to 12 months, mother living with the father of the child, cutting size of children’s meals, and amount of own money spent on food. Conclusions: Women with a Mexican cultural orientation were more likely to breastfeed, live with the father of their children, not reduce the size of their children’s meals and spend more of their own money on food. Women with a US cultural orientation were more likely to work and claim financial stress. Implications: Studies have shown both positive and negative effects of acculturation on Hispanic health behaviors. A low maternal acculturation appeared as a protective factor for several aspects of a home environment for low income children on WIC. Cultural practices such as breastfeeding and living with children’s fathers can impact a child’s experience of food insecurity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Maternal Acculturation and Food Insecurityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158082-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Maternal Acculturation and Food Insecurity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gallagher, Martina</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Scienct Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 7703 Floyd Curl Dr, San Antonio , TX, 78210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lori Noyola; Elizabeth Reifsnider</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Acculturation refers to the changes in attitudes, values and behaviors that result from contact between two distinct cultures. Food insecurity (lacking sufficient food for health and growth) in a home has been show to influence the growth of children. Studies have shown both positive and negative influences of acculturation on Hispanic health behaviors. Little is known of the relationship between maternal acculturation and food insecurity. The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to examine the relationship between maternal acculturation and food insecurity for children. Methods: A secondary analysis was performed on data collected on a study that examined the causes of obesity among Mexican-American toddlers and preschoolers in WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children). Sample size was 375 mother/child dyads. Participants for the study are all enrolled in the WIC program and receive supplemental food and nutrition education. Variables analyzed were maternal acculturation level, as measured by the Acculturation Scale for Mexican Americans, and questionnaire items related to food insecurity for children. Maternal acculturation was scored so a higher score indicated acculturation to a dominant US culture, and a lower score indicated a Mexican cultural view. Results: The variables positively correlated to maternal acculturation were maternal work status and financial stress. Variables negatively correlated with maternal acculturation were breast feeding up to 12 months, mother living with the father of the child, cutting size of children&rsquo;s meals, and amount of own money spent on food. Conclusions: Women with a Mexican cultural orientation were more likely to breastfeed, live with the father of their children, not reduce the size of their children&rsquo;s meals and spend more of their own money on food. Women with a US cultural orientation were more likely to work and claim financial stress. Implications: Studies have shown both positive and negative effects of acculturation on Hispanic health behaviors. A low maternal acculturation appeared as a protective factor for several aspects of a home environment for low income children on WIC. Cultural practices such as breastfeeding and living with children&rsquo;s fathers can impact a child&rsquo;s experience of food insecurity. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:29:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:29:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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