2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158086
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Losing And Gaining Through Miscarriage: Men Vs. Women
Abstract:
Losing And Gaining Through Miscarriage: Men Vs. Women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Houston, Rosalie, RN, MN, Med
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:University of Washington , Department of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA
Co-Authors:Susan Altenhofen, RN, BSN
Purpose: To phenomenologically describe what women and their partners perceive they lost and gained through miscarriage. Background: Swanson’s Miscarriage Model[1] suggests that an important aspect of resolving miscarriage is identifying for the self just what was lost and / or gained through miscarriage. Given that men and women have different experiences of early pregnancy/expectancy and what it is like to take on the role of mother or father, it is expected that they would have differing perspectives on what it means to miscarry. Methods: Field notes from nurse counselor visits with 23 couples provided data for these analyses. Interpretive phenomenology was used by the two research nurses to analyze their intervention notes. Paradigm cases (particularly stirring couples' stories) were initially focused on to interpret themes (thoughts, meanings, and ideas manifest in clients' exact words or more latently embedded in their powerful stories). Exemplars were then sought from all of the clinical field notes to find evidence to support postulated themes. Findings: Men claimed that through their partner’s miscarriage they lost: 1. Our baby/son/daughter; 2. Our intended future; 3. Time (esp. for older parents, and couples with infertility); 4. Her pregnancy; 5. We would have been parents; 6. My wife/partner as she goes through this sadness; and 7. Left out (received minimal, if any, emotional support during/after miscarriage). Women claimed they lost: 1. Our baby/son/daughter; 2. Our intended future; 3. Time (esp. for older parents, and couples with infertility); 5. Feelings of motherhood; 6. Being pregnant; and 7. Trust and innocence. Men identified the following gains: 1. Figured out what matters in life; 2. Grew up / got serious; 3. Deeper empathy for mate and others; 4. At least we know we can get pregnant; 5. Formation of support network as a couple; and 6. Understanding that miscarriage is nature’s way. Women’s gains included: 1. Figured out what matters in life; 2. Awareness that there were big issues between us that needed work; 3. Deeper empathy for other women; 4. Closeness through the “bad” stuff in our relationship; 5. Deepened commitment to being a mother; and 6. Formation of a support network as a couple. Implications: Understanding the experiences of men and women in the first several weeks after miscarriage should facilitate identification of couples’ support needs after miscarriage. Hopefully by focusing on the themes identified through these analyses providers will be better prepared to coach couples on strategies to successfully integrate miscarriage into the fabric of their ongoing relationships.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLosing And Gaining Through Miscarriage: Men Vs. Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158086-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Losing And Gaining Through Miscarriage: Men Vs. Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Houston, Rosalie, RN, MN, Med</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Washington , Department of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Altenhofen, RN, BSN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To phenomenologically describe what women and their partners perceive they lost and gained through miscarriage. Background: Swanson&rsquo;s Miscarriage Model[1] suggests that an important aspect of resolving miscarriage is identifying for the self just what was lost and / or gained through miscarriage. Given that men and women have different experiences of early pregnancy/expectancy and what it is like to take on the role of mother or father, it is expected that they would have differing perspectives on what it means to miscarry. Methods: Field notes from nurse counselor visits with 23 couples provided data for these analyses. Interpretive phenomenology was used by the two research nurses to analyze their intervention notes. Paradigm cases (particularly stirring couples' stories) were initially focused on to interpret themes (thoughts, meanings, and ideas manifest in clients' exact words or more latently embedded in their powerful stories). Exemplars were then sought from all of the clinical field notes to find evidence to support postulated themes. Findings: Men claimed that through their partner&rsquo;s miscarriage they lost: 1. Our baby/son/daughter; 2. Our intended future; 3. Time (esp. for older parents, and couples with infertility); 4. Her pregnancy; 5. We would have been parents; 6. My wife/partner as she goes through this sadness; and 7. Left out (received minimal, if any, emotional support during/after miscarriage). Women claimed they lost: 1. Our baby/son/daughter; 2. Our intended future; 3. Time (esp. for older parents, and couples with infertility); 5. Feelings of motherhood; 6. Being pregnant; and 7. Trust and innocence. Men identified the following gains: 1. Figured out what matters in life; 2. Grew up / got serious; 3. Deeper empathy for mate and others; 4. At least we know we can get pregnant; 5. Formation of support network as a couple; and 6. Understanding that miscarriage is nature&rsquo;s way. Women&rsquo;s gains included: 1. Figured out what matters in life; 2. Awareness that there were big issues between us that needed work; 3. Deeper empathy for other women; 4. Closeness through the &ldquo;bad&rdquo; stuff in our relationship; 5. Deepened commitment to being a mother; and 6. Formation of a support network as a couple. Implications: Understanding the experiences of men and women in the first several weeks after miscarriage should facilitate identification of couples&rsquo; support needs after miscarriage. Hopefully by focusing on the themes identified through these analyses providers will be better prepared to coach couples on strategies to successfully integrate miscarriage into the fabric of their ongoing relationships. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:29:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:29:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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