2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158088
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Personality on Medication Adherence
Abstract:
The Influence of Personality on Medication Adherence
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Insel, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Contact Address:, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721
Co-Authors:Chao-pin Hsiao
This investigation examined the predictive ability of the personality characteristics of methodicalness and industriousness on medication adherence. A secondary purpose was to examine the influence of two cognitive factors after removal of the influence of the personality factors on medication adherence. Medication adherence is described as a function of several factors including the ability to access prescribed medications (e.g. costs, transportation), interpretation of the illness and meaningfulness of the prescribed medication in relationship to treatment, and more recently, cognitive function particularly prefrontal function. Using Lawton’s conceptual framework of environmental press and individual resources, this investigation examined the possible helpful personal resources of personality on medication adherence. The sample consisted of 58 older adults with a mean age of 77 years (range 67 – 89). Forty-two self identified as Caucasian, 13 with Hispanic heritage and 3 African Americans. Forty participants were monitored for adherence to antihypertensives, 7 for lipid lowering agents, 9 for anti-arthritic medications, 1 for ASA and 1 for adherence to quinine sulfate. Participants enrolled in a prior investigation were approached through the mail about completing the Six Factor Personality Inventory. Those who responded returned the questionnaire. The questionnaire was modified to ease the readability of the items and to decrease confusion concerning the response options of each item (the font was increased to 14 and the likert scaling of strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree, and strongly disagree were printed under each item rather than request participants complete the bubble sheet normally used for this questionnaire. Medication adherence was indexed with the Medication Electronic Monitoring System by Aardex®. Participants had completed a cognitive assessment battery and monitored for 56 days. Eighty- five questionnaires were mailed. Sixty participants returned the questionnaires for a total response rate of 70%. Missing data on two questionnaires prevented inclusion in the study, dropping the number of participants to 58. Sequential regression analysis was used with the dependent variable medication adherence indexed by the number of days the medication was taken as prescribed. Methodicalness, as a personality factor, was hypothesized to predict medication adherence. It was entered first, followed by industriousness, cognitive function was indexed by performance on executive function measures in a cognitive battery and was entered third and finally the cognitive factor for medial temporal function was entered. The only significant factor predicting medication adherence was the prefrontal factor (R2 change = .10 p < .05). Methodicalness and industriousness failed to predict medication adherence. Medication adherence is an important self-care activity yet adhereing to medication remains difficult since estimates of nonadherence are as great as 50%. Attempts to predict client characteristics that describe who is at risk for medication nonadherence often fail. In this case, personality characteristics of methodicalness and industriousness failed to predict medication adherence. However, the prefrontal cognitive factor remained robust even after removing the variance related to the personality factors. Clearly, the prefrontal factor is an important determinant in identifying who is at risk for nonadherence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Personality on Medication Adherenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158088-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Personality on Medication Adherence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Insel, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chao-pin Hsiao</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This investigation examined the predictive ability of the personality characteristics of methodicalness and industriousness on medication adherence. A secondary purpose was to examine the influence of two cognitive factors after removal of the influence of the personality factors on medication adherence. Medication adherence is described as a function of several factors including the ability to access prescribed medications (e.g. costs, transportation), interpretation of the illness and meaningfulness of the prescribed medication in relationship to treatment, and more recently, cognitive function particularly prefrontal function. Using Lawton&rsquo;s conceptual framework of environmental press and individual resources, this investigation examined the possible helpful personal resources of personality on medication adherence. The sample consisted of 58 older adults with a mean age of 77 years (range 67 &ndash; 89). Forty-two self identified as Caucasian, 13 with Hispanic heritage and 3 African Americans. Forty participants were monitored for adherence to antihypertensives, 7 for lipid lowering agents, 9 for anti-arthritic medications, 1 for ASA and 1 for adherence to quinine sulfate. Participants enrolled in a prior investigation were approached through the mail about completing the Six Factor Personality Inventory. Those who responded returned the questionnaire. The questionnaire was modified to ease the readability of the items and to decrease confusion concerning the response options of each item (the font was increased to 14 and the likert scaling of strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree, and strongly disagree were printed under each item rather than request participants complete the bubble sheet normally used for this questionnaire. Medication adherence was indexed with the Medication Electronic Monitoring System by Aardex&reg;. Participants had completed a cognitive assessment battery and monitored for 56 days. Eighty- five questionnaires were mailed. Sixty participants returned the questionnaires for a total response rate of 70%. Missing data on two questionnaires prevented inclusion in the study, dropping the number of participants to 58. Sequential regression analysis was used with the dependent variable medication adherence indexed by the number of days the medication was taken as prescribed. Methodicalness, as a personality factor, was hypothesized to predict medication adherence. It was entered first, followed by industriousness, cognitive function was indexed by performance on executive function measures in a cognitive battery and was entered third and finally the cognitive factor for medial temporal function was entered. The only significant factor predicting medication adherence was the prefrontal factor (R2 change = .10 p &lt; .05). Methodicalness and industriousness failed to predict medication adherence. Medication adherence is an important self-care activity yet adhereing to medication remains difficult since estimates of nonadherence are as great as 50%. Attempts to predict client characteristics that describe who is at risk for medication nonadherence often fail. In this case, personality characteristics of methodicalness and industriousness failed to predict medication adherence. However, the prefrontal cognitive factor remained robust even after removing the variance related to the personality factors. Clearly, the prefrontal factor is an important determinant in identifying who is at risk for nonadherence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:29:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:29:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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