2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158090
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of an Intervention for Infant Irritability
Abstract:
Effectiveness of an Intervention for Infant Irritability
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Keefe, Maureen, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah College of Nursing
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105, USA
Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based nursing intervention, the REST Routine, in diminishing the intensity and duration of unexplained early infant irritability or infant colic. Method: A two-site clinical trial was conducted on 164 healthy full-term infants with excessive unexplained irritability or colic. Infants between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks were randomized to routine care or a home-based intervention program (n =121). A third group (n = 43) of infants too old at entry for randomization (mean age = 10.4 + 2.1 weeks), were entered into a post-test only group. Trained advanced practice nurses delivered the REST Routine intervention program which incorporates the use of infant behavior assessment, pattern recognition, individualized infant schedules, specific management strategies as well as parent education and support. A separate trained evaluation team obtained measurements at baseline and at specified intervals during and following the 4 week intervention program. Weekly reports of the average amount of unexplained infant crying or fussiness, using the Fussiness Rating Scale and parental responses to a structured exit interview were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention program. Findings: Mean infant crying levels in both the treatment and control groups were reported to be over 5 hours per day of unexplained crying (5.7 + 3.2) upon intake. Both randomized groups showed a developmental decrease in crying over the 8 week study period. However, infants in the REST Routine treatment group cried 1.7 hours per day following the 4 week intervention as compared to 3 hours for the infants in the control group (p = .02). Both the control group and post test only group reported crying levels that were significantly higher than the treatment group (p < .001). Infant irritability was resolved in 62% of the treatment group and only 29% of the control group at the time of the 8 week follow-up visit (p = .04). Implications: The findings support the emerging view of infant colic or unexplained irritability as a developmental, behavioral pattern that resolves over time and is responsive to environmental modification and structured, cue-based care. Families in both the treatment and control groups reported benefiting from a nurse visiting in their home to inquire about their infant and their well being. Options for individualizing the program for those most in need of intensive home visiting and other delivery modes for the intervention are areas for further investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of an Intervention for Infant Irritabilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158090-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effectiveness of an Intervention for Infant Irritability</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keefe, Maureen, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based nursing intervention, the REST Routine, in diminishing the intensity and duration of unexplained early infant irritability or infant colic. Method: A two-site clinical trial was conducted on 164 healthy full-term infants with excessive unexplained irritability or colic. Infants between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks were randomized to routine care or a home-based intervention program (n =121). A third group (n = 43) of infants too old at entry for randomization (mean age = 10.4 + 2.1 weeks), were entered into a post-test only group. Trained advanced practice nurses delivered the REST Routine intervention program which incorporates the use of infant behavior assessment, pattern recognition, individualized infant schedules, specific management strategies as well as parent education and support. A separate trained evaluation team obtained measurements at baseline and at specified intervals during and following the 4 week intervention program. Weekly reports of the average amount of unexplained infant crying or fussiness, using the Fussiness Rating Scale and parental responses to a structured exit interview were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention program. Findings: Mean infant crying levels in both the treatment and control groups were reported to be over 5 hours per day of unexplained crying (5.7 + 3.2) upon intake. Both randomized groups showed a developmental decrease in crying over the 8 week study period. However, infants in the REST Routine treatment group cried 1.7 hours per day following the 4 week intervention as compared to 3 hours for the infants in the control group (p = .02). Both the control group and post test only group reported crying levels that were significantly higher than the treatment group (p &lt; .001). Infant irritability was resolved in 62% of the treatment group and only 29% of the control group at the time of the 8 week follow-up visit (p = .04). Implications: The findings support the emerging view of infant colic or unexplained irritability as a developmental, behavioral pattern that resolves over time and is responsive to environmental modification and structured, cue-based care. Families in both the treatment and control groups reported benefiting from a nurse visiting in their home to inquire about their infant and their well being. Options for individualizing the program for those most in need of intensive home visiting and other delivery modes for the intervention are areas for further investigation. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:29:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:29:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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