2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158091
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaborative Process Indicators: Predictors of Public Health Preparedness
Abstract:
Collaborative Process Indicators: Predictors of Public Health Preparedness
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Kuntz, Sandra, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing
Contact Address:Missoula Campus, 32 Campus Drive 7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA
Purposes/Aims: This study investigated the relationship between intersectoral collaboration and level of preparedness among local public health agencies (counties and tribes) in Montana. Although intersectoral collaboration reverberates as a critical intervention for responding to public health problems, little scholarly literature documents the direct or indirect relationship between collaboration and disaster preparedness in rural areas. Conceptual Basis: Sullivan’s conceptual model of collaboration and Florin’s process- related stages of partnership formed the organizing framework for this study. Methods: A descriptive, correlational study design was used to explore the research questions for this project. The Montana Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capacity Assessment created a critical capacities baseline and documented the current status of local agency activity in six specific focus areas: (a) preparedness planning and readiness assessment; (b) surveillance and epidemiology capacity; (c) laboratory capacity; (d) communications and information technology; (e) risk communication; and (f) workforce education and training. An Emergency Preparedness Index (EPI) scoring matrix was developed to generate a continuous measure of preparedness. Next, a research crosswalk linked Capacity Assessment items to predictor variables (indicators of collaboration) and the response variable (preparedness). Multiple regression analysis was conducted to evaluate how well six nominal and continuous indicators of collaboration in four categories (communication, linkages, state of partnership, and education/training) predicted preparedness. Results: The unit of analysis for this study: the local public health agency. A total of 53 counties (94%) and three of seven Montana tribes (42%) completed the Capacity Assessment and were reimbursed through a contract with the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services. The assessment data was initially entered into SPSS 11.0 by the University of Washington Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Three types of descriptive data reports (counts, frequencies, and means) were generated including individual county/tribe reports, regional data, and a statewide summary. Multiple regression analysis by this researcher supported the premise that process-related collaboration factors are significant predictors of public health emergency preparedness. A positive linear relationship between the response variable and each of the six predictor (collaboration indicator) models was found. Implications: This research highlights the significance of specific partnership activities (collaboration-related education and training, development of formal agreements, key partner linkages, and electronic as well as direct communication among system partners) necessary for protecting the public’s health during a disaster. With nurses accounting for approximately 66% of the public health workforce in Montana (many holding leadership and/or health officer positions), the results of this study provide evidence critical for improving public health nursing practice related to preparedness for bioterrorism and other public health emergencies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaborative Process Indicators: Predictors of Public Health Preparednessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158091-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Collaborative Process Indicators: Predictors of Public Health Preparedness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kuntz, Sandra, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Missoula Campus, 32 Campus Drive 7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: This study investigated the relationship between intersectoral collaboration and level of preparedness among local public health agencies (counties and tribes) in Montana. Although intersectoral collaboration reverberates as a critical intervention for responding to public health problems, little scholarly literature documents the direct or indirect relationship between collaboration and disaster preparedness in rural areas. Conceptual Basis: Sullivan&rsquo;s conceptual model of collaboration and Florin&rsquo;s process- related stages of partnership formed the organizing framework for this study. Methods: A descriptive, correlational study design was used to explore the research questions for this project. The Montana Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capacity Assessment created a critical capacities baseline and documented the current status of local agency activity in six specific focus areas: (a) preparedness planning and readiness assessment; (b) surveillance and epidemiology capacity; (c) laboratory capacity; (d) communications and information technology; (e) risk communication; and (f) workforce education and training. An Emergency Preparedness Index (EPI) scoring matrix was developed to generate a continuous measure of preparedness. Next, a research crosswalk linked Capacity Assessment items to predictor variables (indicators of collaboration) and the response variable (preparedness). Multiple regression analysis was conducted to evaluate how well six nominal and continuous indicators of collaboration in four categories (communication, linkages, state of partnership, and education/training) predicted preparedness. Results: The unit of analysis for this study: the local public health agency. A total of 53 counties (94%) and three of seven Montana tribes (42%) completed the Capacity Assessment and were reimbursed through a contract with the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services. The assessment data was initially entered into SPSS 11.0 by the University of Washington Northwest Center for Public Health Practice. Three types of descriptive data reports (counts, frequencies, and means) were generated including individual county/tribe reports, regional data, and a statewide summary. Multiple regression analysis by this researcher supported the premise that process-related collaboration factors are significant predictors of public health emergency preparedness. A positive linear relationship between the response variable and each of the six predictor (collaboration indicator) models was found. Implications: This research highlights the significance of specific partnership activities (collaboration-related education and training, development of formal agreements, key partner linkages, and electronic as well as direct communication among system partners) necessary for protecting the public&rsquo;s health during a disaster. With nurses accounting for approximately 66% of the public health workforce in Montana (many holding leadership and/or health officer positions), the results of this study provide evidence critical for improving public health nursing practice related to preparedness for bioterrorism and other public health emergencies. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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