2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158093
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivation and Physical Activity Among Older Adults
Abstract:
Motivation and Physical Activity Among Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lee, Young-Shin, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of San Diego
Contact Address:Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110, USA
BACKGROUND: Motivation is a well-known prerequisite for engagement in exercise and physical activity, but it is rarely measured as a research variable. As a result, there is limited information about the types and amount of motivation that induce older adults to adopt exercise behaviors. PURPOSE: This study describes physical activity among older adults and the relationship between types of motivation and the amount of physical activity. METHODS: A convenience sample of 267 adults aged 60 to 75 years completed self-report questionnaires. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation were measured using a revised version of the Motivation for Physical Activity Measure (MPAM), and the amount of physical activity was measured using the Habitual Physical Activity Questionnaire. FINDINGS: The majority of the sample were female (69%) and Caucasian (64%). Most had completed high school (76%), and the mean age of the sample was 69 (± 4.30). Desire for fitness was represented by the highest scores (mean = 6.01) among five subscales. Extrinsic and intrinsic motivation were significantly related to physical activity. Among the intrinsic motivation, motivation for enjoyment (? = .293, p < .001) and motivation for competence (? = .286, p < .001) were significantly correlated with physical activity, but social motivation was not significantly related to physical activity. Among the extrinsic motivation, desire for fitness (? = .384, p < .001) and appearance (? = .267, p < .001) were correlated with physical activity. Caucasians represented significantly higher motivation for appearance than non-Caucasians (F = 5.84, p < .05). IMPLICATION/CONCLUSIONS: The study findings indicate that older adults are more motivated to engage in physical activity out of a desire for fitness (an extrinsic motivation) rather than for enjoyment or competence (intrinsic motivations). This result implies that older adults are extrinsically motivated to engage in physical activity to improve their health rather than to pursue an interest in leisure physical activity or in exercise for its own sake. The finding suggests that healthcare providers need to emphasize the health benefits of regular physical activity in the daily lives of the elderly.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivation and Physical Activity Among Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158093-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivation and Physical Activity Among Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Young-Shin, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of San Diego</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Hahn School of Nursing and Health Science, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Motivation is a well-known prerequisite for engagement in exercise and physical activity, but it is rarely measured as a research variable. As a result, there is limited information about the types and amount of motivation that induce older adults to adopt exercise behaviors. PURPOSE: This study describes physical activity among older adults and the relationship between types of motivation and the amount of physical activity. METHODS: A convenience sample of 267 adults aged 60 to 75 years completed self-report questionnaires. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation were measured using a revised version of the Motivation for Physical Activity Measure (MPAM), and the amount of physical activity was measured using the Habitual Physical Activity Questionnaire. FINDINGS: The majority of the sample were female (69%) and Caucasian (64%). Most had completed high school (76%), and the mean age of the sample was 69 (&plusmn; 4.30). Desire for fitness was represented by the highest scores (mean = 6.01) among five subscales. Extrinsic and intrinsic motivation were significantly related to physical activity. Among the intrinsic motivation, motivation for enjoyment (? = .293, p &lt; .001) and motivation for competence (? = .286, p &lt; .001) were significantly correlated with physical activity, but social motivation was not significantly related to physical activity. Among the extrinsic motivation, desire for fitness (? = .384, p &lt; .001) and appearance (? = .267, p &lt; .001) were correlated with physical activity. Caucasians represented significantly higher motivation for appearance than non-Caucasians (F = 5.84, p &lt; .05). IMPLICATION/CONCLUSIONS: The study findings indicate that older adults are more motivated to engage in physical activity out of a desire for fitness (an extrinsic motivation) rather than for enjoyment or competence (intrinsic motivations). This result implies that older adults are extrinsically motivated to engage in physical activity to improve their health rather than to pursue an interest in leisure physical activity or in exercise for its own sake. The finding suggests that healthcare providers need to emphasize the health benefits of regular physical activity in the daily lives of the elderly.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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