2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158095
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Foot bathing on distal-proximal temperature gradient in elders
Abstract:
Foot bathing on distal-proximal temperature gradient in elders
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Liao, Wen-Chun, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health System, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7260 , USA
Co-Authors:Landis, C; Chiu, MJ; & Lentz, M
Background: Increased distal-proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG), an indicator of skin blood flow, is associated with better sleep initiation and maintenance. Warm foot bathing can affect distal skin temperature to change DPG. However, optimum water temperature and duration of foot bathing to raise DPG remains unknown. Purpose: Explore the effects of one-hour foot bathing at water temperatures of 40°C and 41°C on distal-proximal skin temperature gradient in Taiwanese elders. Method: We recruited 3 females and 3 males aged from 60 to 73 years. The data were collected at subjects’ home. Each subject had his/her feet and legs immersed into bathtub up to 20 cm above the ankles. The bathtub maintained water temperature constantly at the set level. The sequence of applying either 40°C or 41°C water was randomly assigned. The abdomen temperature was recorded at 1-minute interval with a 4-channel Mini-Logger (Mini Metter Co., Inc., OR, USA). The foot temperature was recorded before foot bathing, at 10-minute interval during bathing, and at 1-minute interval after bathing. DPG was obtained by subtracting abdomen temperature from foot temperature. Ambient temperature ranged from 28.6°C ~ 30.2°C and humidity from 47% to 73% in summer. Timing for foot bathing was either at 2:00pm ~ 6:30pm or at 8:00pm ~ 11:20pm. Result: The effect of foot bathing on DPG was similar at both water temperatures. The two mean DPG curves followed the same trend. During the bathing, there was a 1st peak DPG at 10 min, which decreased gradually to reach a nadir at 30 min, and then increased a little bit to reach the 2nd peak at 50 min. After bathing, the DPGs were gradually declined. In the 41°C curve, the DPGs after 2nd peak point attained a plateau until 2-3 min out of bath. In the 40°C curve, the DPGs attained a plateau at 40-50 min and started decline at 50 min. The DPGs at the 2nd peak and after out of bathing reached a higher value in 41°C water than that in 40°C. At 41°C water, the DPGs of five subjects were greater than 0°C after 10-min of bathing. At 40°C of water, the DPGs of all subjects reached 0°C after 20-min of bathing. All subjects tolerated both bathing temperatures well for 1 hour. Implication: Both 40°C and 41°C of foot bathing water can increase DPG. Foot bathing in 41°C water exhibits higher DPGs at the 2nd peak and also maintains higher after out of bathing than those in 40°C. We suggest that foot bathing at either 40°C water for 50 minutes or 41°C water for 40 minutes is effective to affect skin blood flow. Findings in this study are being used in a study to examine effects of warm foot bathing on sleep quality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFoot bathing on distal-proximal temperature gradient in eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158095-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Foot bathing on distal-proximal temperature gradient in elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Liao, Wen-Chun, RN, MS </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health System, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7260 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Landis, C; Chiu, MJ; &amp; Lentz, M</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Increased distal-proximal skin temperature gradient (DPG), an indicator of skin blood flow, is associated with better sleep initiation and maintenance. Warm foot bathing can affect distal skin temperature to change DPG. However, optimum water temperature and duration of foot bathing to raise DPG remains unknown. Purpose: Explore the effects of one-hour foot bathing at water temperatures of 40&deg;C and 41&deg;C on distal-proximal skin temperature gradient in Taiwanese elders. Method: We recruited 3 females and 3 males aged from 60 to 73 years. The data were collected at subjects&rsquo; home. Each subject had his/her feet and legs immersed into bathtub up to 20 cm above the ankles. The bathtub maintained water temperature constantly at the set level. The sequence of applying either 40&deg;C or 41&deg;C water was randomly assigned. The abdomen temperature was recorded at 1-minute interval with a 4-channel Mini-Logger (Mini Metter Co., Inc., OR, USA). The foot temperature was recorded before foot bathing, at 10-minute interval during bathing, and at 1-minute interval after bathing. DPG was obtained by subtracting abdomen temperature from foot temperature. Ambient temperature ranged from 28.6&deg;C ~ 30.2&deg;C and humidity from 47% to 73% in summer. Timing for foot bathing was either at 2:00pm ~ 6:30pm or at 8:00pm ~ 11:20pm. Result: The effect of foot bathing on DPG was similar at both water temperatures. The two mean DPG curves followed the same trend. During the bathing, there was a 1st peak DPG at 10 min, which decreased gradually to reach a nadir at 30 min, and then increased a little bit to reach the 2nd peak at 50 min. After bathing, the DPGs were gradually declined. In the 41&deg;C curve, the DPGs after 2nd peak point attained a plateau until 2-3 min out of bath. In the 40&deg;C curve, the DPGs attained a plateau at 40-50 min and started decline at 50 min. The DPGs at the 2nd peak and after out of bathing reached a higher value in 41&deg;C water than that in 40&deg;C. At 41&deg;C water, the DPGs of five subjects were greater than 0&deg;C after 10-min of bathing. At 40&deg;C of water, the DPGs of all subjects reached 0&deg;C after 20-min of bathing. All subjects tolerated both bathing temperatures well for 1 hour. Implication: Both 40&deg;C and 41&deg;C of foot bathing water can increase DPG. Foot bathing in 41&deg;C water exhibits higher DPGs at the 2nd peak and also maintains higher after out of bathing than those in 40&deg;C. We suggest that foot bathing at either 40&deg;C water for 50 minutes or 41&deg;C water for 40 minutes is effective to affect skin blood flow. Findings in this study are being used in a study to examine effects of warm foot bathing on sleep quality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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