2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158096
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parent Infant Interaction in Irritable Infants
Abstract:
Parent Infant Interaction in Irritable Infants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lobo, Marie, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of NM College of Nursing
Contact Address:MSC09, 53501, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the differences in parent-infant interaction and parenting stress in randomized groups of families with colicky or irritable infants who have received the REST Routine Program and those who have not received the intervention. The hypothesis being tested was “parents who have received the REST Routine Program would exhibit more synchrony in the parent infant relationship and lower levels of parenting stress than parents receiving routine care. Rationale: Having an infant with unexplained, persistent crying is one of the most stressful events in the lives of new parents. Colic or persistent, unexplained crying is associated with shaken baby syndrome in young infants and can be a trigger for child abuse or other forms of parental dysfunction. Methods: An individualized nursing intervention, the REST Routine Program was tested in a randomized clinical trial. Mother infant dyads were studied at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after entry into the study. A cohort of post test only were added after the beginning of the study, providing three groups, intervention, controls and post-test only. These individuals were too old to enter the study, but provided a week 8 data collection point. Data were collected using the Child Assessment Feeding Scale (NCAFS) and the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) at three different time points by a trained data collector. Data collectors were blind to the group assignment. Interrater reliability was checked every 6 months using videotapes. Interrater reliability of 85% was held between and among data collectors. Results: Experimental and controls were compared on the quality of parent infant interaction using the NCAFS at baseline and 4 weeks after entry into the study. When an ANOVA was used to compare the experimental group, the control group and the post-test only group at 8 weeks there were no significant differences. Statistically significant differences were found in PSI, Parent- Child Dysfunctional Interaction subscale. Some of the individual NCAFS items revealed a modification in parent interaction patterns reflected in the areas of cognitive and social emotional growth fostering. Implications: Baseline & 4 week Infant Scores are close to the NCAFS 10th percentile cutoff recommending intervention. The intervention mothers are taught to change the quality of their interaction and this may be reflected in the slightly lower NCAFS scores. Parenting stress levels were alarming high in both groups as well. The nurse visits for data collection as well as intervention visits were perceived as helpful in reducing the stress level associated with parenting these infants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParent Infant Interaction in Irritable Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158096-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parent Infant Interaction in Irritable Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lobo, Marie, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of NM College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09, 53501, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the differences in parent-infant interaction and parenting stress in randomized groups of families with colicky or irritable infants who have received the REST Routine Program and those who have not received the intervention. The hypothesis being tested was &ldquo;parents who have received the REST Routine Program would exhibit more synchrony in the parent infant relationship and lower levels of parenting stress than parents receiving routine care. Rationale: Having an infant with unexplained, persistent crying is one of the most stressful events in the lives of new parents. Colic or persistent, unexplained crying is associated with shaken baby syndrome in young infants and can be a trigger for child abuse or other forms of parental dysfunction. Methods: An individualized nursing intervention, the REST Routine Program was tested in a randomized clinical trial. Mother infant dyads were studied at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after entry into the study. A cohort of post test only were added after the beginning of the study, providing three groups, intervention, controls and post-test only. These individuals were too old to enter the study, but provided a week 8 data collection point. Data were collected using the Child Assessment Feeding Scale (NCAFS) and the Parenting Stress Index (PSI) at three different time points by a trained data collector. Data collectors were blind to the group assignment. Interrater reliability was checked every 6 months using videotapes. Interrater reliability of 85% was held between and among data collectors. Results: Experimental and controls were compared on the quality of parent infant interaction using the NCAFS at baseline and 4 weeks after entry into the study. When an ANOVA was used to compare the experimental group, the control group and the post-test only group at 8 weeks there were no significant differences. Statistically significant differences were found in PSI, Parent- Child Dysfunctional Interaction subscale. Some of the individual NCAFS items revealed a modification in parent interaction patterns reflected in the areas of cognitive and social emotional growth fostering. Implications: Baseline &amp; 4 week Infant Scores are close to the NCAFS 10th percentile cutoff recommending intervention. The intervention mothers are taught to change the quality of their interaction and this may be reflected in the slightly lower NCAFS scores. Parenting stress levels were alarming high in both groups as well. The nurse visits for data collection as well as intervention visits were perceived as helpful in reducing the stress level associated with parenting these infants.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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