2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158097
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parental reports of favorite activities they do with young children
Abstract:
Parental reports of favorite activities they do with young children
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lobo, Marie, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of NM College of Nursing
Contact Address:MSC09, 53501, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA
Co-Authors:Havig-Lipke; Williams, T; Shipp V
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe parental reports of favorite activities they do with their children ages birth to 6 years in a cohort of parents attending university sponsored well-child clinics in the Southeastern United State. Rationale: The early environment has a profound impact on the development of a child’s social, emotional and cognitive skills. Children from families living in poverty are at greater risk for social and cognitive delays and emotional problems. Understanding what activities parents prefer for their children provides a base for interventions which promote social, emotional and cognitive wellness during well-child visits. Methods: Parents, whose children were attending a clinic implementing Reach Out and Read, a clinic based literacy program, were recruited to participate in a survey about their favorite activities to do with their child. The study was deemed exempt by the Institutional Review Board. Parents were interviewed about their 3 favorite activities to do with their child. RAs recorded the raw answers. Content analysis of the results has been completed. Results: 496 mothers, 80% African American, 15% Caucasian, 5% Hispanic, and other ethnicities with 237 female (49%) and 248 male children (51%) participated in the study. A total of 1404 “favorite activities” were identified. 58.6% (823) of the favored activities included parent-child interaction, 9.3% (131) included television, videos or video games; 18.1% (255) included physical activity or being outside, and 13.2% (185) included play and play with toys. 5% (39) of the favorite parent-child interaction activities took place in fast food restaurants. 34% of parent-child interaction took place around reading or book activities, after the implementation of Reach Out and Read in the clinic. Implications: The children attending these clinics attend schools where up to 40% of children are not ready for first grade. Given the apparent opportunities for parents to interact with their children these children have not been given optimal verbal stimulation. The long term effects of clinic based early interventions focused on cognitive and language development are yet to be explored. Given problems with obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus in this population the lower physical activity levels are troublesome. Well-child visits offer an opportunity to encourage increased physical activity and better nutritional habits. Supported in part by a grant from the University Research Committee, Medical University of South Carolina
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParental reports of favorite activities they do with young childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158097-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parental reports of favorite activities they do with young children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lobo, Marie, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of NM College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MSC09, 53501, Albuquerque, NM, 87131-0001, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Havig-Lipke; Williams, T; Shipp V</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe parental reports of favorite activities they do with their children ages birth to 6 years in a cohort of parents attending university sponsored well-child clinics in the Southeastern United State. Rationale: The early environment has a profound impact on the development of a child&rsquo;s social, emotional and cognitive skills. Children from families living in poverty are at greater risk for social and cognitive delays and emotional problems. Understanding what activities parents prefer for their children provides a base for interventions which promote social, emotional and cognitive wellness during well-child visits. Methods: Parents, whose children were attending a clinic implementing Reach Out and Read, a clinic based literacy program, were recruited to participate in a survey about their favorite activities to do with their child. The study was deemed exempt by the Institutional Review Board. Parents were interviewed about their 3 favorite activities to do with their child. RAs recorded the raw answers. Content analysis of the results has been completed. Results: 496 mothers, 80% African American, 15% Caucasian, 5% Hispanic, and other ethnicities with 237 female (49%) and 248 male children (51%) participated in the study. A total of 1404 &ldquo;favorite activities&rdquo; were identified. 58.6% (823) of the favored activities included parent-child interaction, 9.3% (131) included television, videos or video games; 18.1% (255) included physical activity or being outside, and 13.2% (185) included play and play with toys. 5% (39) of the favorite parent-child interaction activities took place in fast food restaurants. 34% of parent-child interaction took place around reading or book activities, after the implementation of Reach Out and Read in the clinic. Implications: The children attending these clinics attend schools where up to 40% of children are not ready for first grade. Given the apparent opportunities for parents to interact with their children these children have not been given optimal verbal stimulation. The long term effects of clinic based early interventions focused on cognitive and language development are yet to be explored. Given problems with obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus in this population the lower physical activity levels are troublesome. Well-child visits offer an opportunity to encourage increased physical activity and better nutritional habits. Supported in part by a grant from the University Research Committee, Medical University of South Carolina</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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