2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158099
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depressed Mood during the Menopausal Transition
Abstract:
Depressed Mood during the Menopausal Transition
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Mariella, Anne , RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:University of Washington, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA
Co-Authors:Mitchell, ES; Woods, NF
Introduction: Despite research showing no relationship between menopausal transition and depressive symptoms, interest in depressed mood during the menopausal transition remains high. The Seattle Midlife Women’s Health Study has benefited from prospectively recorded monthly ratings of depressed mood for up to five years. Purpose: To describe patterns of depressed mood during the menopausal transition. Methods: Women either during the menopausal transition and/or less than five years post menopause rated depressed mood monthly from 0-4 in a diary for up to three days in a row during the postmenstrual phase of the menstrual cycle, if cycling. Cluster analysis of the following variables was used: (1) the percent of days with zero ratings of depressed mood; (2) the percent of days rated 3-4; and (3) the slope of a simple regressed line through the time-ordered ratings. The last variable was intended to capture the ordering over time of the repeated measures. Results: There were 291 women with at least ten menstrual cycles of symptom data. Five main clusters (patterns) were meaningfully distinct from each other. For the largest cluster (N=112; 38.5% of total sample) 93% of days the depression item was rated zero. The second largest cluster (N=89; 30.6%) showed 68% of days rated as zero, 5% of days rated 3 or 4, with a slope near zero indicating little net change over time. The third largest cluster (N=43; 14.8%) showed 6.4% of days with the depression item rated 3 or 4, only 39% of days rated as zero, and a slope near zero. The fourth cluster (N=24; 8.3%) showed 6% percent of days rated zero and 8% of days rated 3 or 4. This group, however, had a negative slope of –0.13 indicating improvement over time in mood. The fifth cluster (N=23; 7.9%) showed 29% of days rated at zero and 25% at 3-4, indicating the greatest lability in mood, with a positive slope of 0.1, indicating increasing depressed mood over time. A single woman with no ratings of zero and most at 3-4 clustered separately. Women in the two largest clusters and in the fourth largest cluster demonstrated fairly stable depressed mood ratings of 0 (93% of days), 0 (68% of days), and 1 or 2 (86% of days), respectively, indicating the majority of women were relatively stable at non or minimally depressed mood over five years. Implications: Analysis of daily depressed mood ratings produced similar findings to analyses of yearly depressive symptoms in an earlier study. The majority of women for the majority of the time experienced the menopausal transition without a high severity of depressed mood. Nevertheless, a small group of women had labile mood worsening over time. Further study to identify predictors and interventions for this group is warranted. Funding Source: NINR RO1-NR04141.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepressed Mood during the Menopausal Transitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158099-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Depressed Mood during the Menopausal Transition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mariella, Anne , RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, ES; Woods, NF</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Despite research showing no relationship between menopausal transition and depressive symptoms, interest in depressed mood during the menopausal transition remains high. The Seattle Midlife Women&rsquo;s Health Study has benefited from prospectively recorded monthly ratings of depressed mood for up to five years. Purpose: To describe patterns of depressed mood during the menopausal transition. Methods: Women either during the menopausal transition and/or less than five years post menopause rated depressed mood monthly from 0-4 in a diary for up to three days in a row during the postmenstrual phase of the menstrual cycle, if cycling. Cluster analysis of the following variables was used: (1) the percent of days with zero ratings of depressed mood; (2) the percent of days rated 3-4; and (3) the slope of a simple regressed line through the time-ordered ratings. The last variable was intended to capture the ordering over time of the repeated measures. Results: There were 291 women with at least ten menstrual cycles of symptom data. Five main clusters (patterns) were meaningfully distinct from each other. For the largest cluster (N=112; 38.5% of total sample) 93% of days the depression item was rated zero. The second largest cluster (N=89; 30.6%) showed 68% of days rated as zero, 5% of days rated 3 or 4, with a slope near zero indicating little net change over time. The third largest cluster (N=43; 14.8%) showed 6.4% of days with the depression item rated 3 or 4, only 39% of days rated as zero, and a slope near zero. The fourth cluster (N=24; 8.3%) showed 6% percent of days rated zero and 8% of days rated 3 or 4. This group, however, had a negative slope of &ndash;0.13 indicating improvement over time in mood. The fifth cluster (N=23; 7.9%) showed 29% of days rated at zero and 25% at 3-4, indicating the greatest lability in mood, with a positive slope of 0.1, indicating increasing depressed mood over time. A single woman with no ratings of zero and most at 3-4 clustered separately. Women in the two largest clusters and in the fourth largest cluster demonstrated fairly stable depressed mood ratings of 0 (93% of days), 0 (68% of days), and 1 or 2 (86% of days), respectively, indicating the majority of women were relatively stable at non or minimally depressed mood over five years. Implications: Analysis of daily depressed mood ratings produced similar findings to analyses of yearly depressive symptoms in an earlier study. The majority of women for the majority of the time experienced the menopausal transition without a high severity of depressed mood. Nevertheless, a small group of women had labile mood worsening over time. Further study to identify predictors and interventions for this group is warranted. Funding Source: NINR RO1-NR04141. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.