2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158100
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Colliding Explanatory Models: Mexican Immigrants’ LTBI Experience
Abstract:
Colliding Explanatory Models: Mexican Immigrants’ LTBI Experience
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:McEwen, M., PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona, College of Nursing
Contact Address:University of Arizona, CON, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AR, 85721-0203, USA
AIMS: The specific aims of this study were to: (1) illicit the Mexican immigrants’ explanatory model (EM) of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and tuberculosis disease (TB) and, (2) illuminate the influence of their EM on preventive treatment for LTBI. Research questions were: (1) What is the immigrants’ EM of LTBI? (2) What are the points of congruence and departure between the immigrants’ EM of LTBI and the US and Mexico professional EM of LTBI? (3) How does the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of the US-Mexico border influence the immigrants’ EM of LTBI? (4) How does the Mexican immigrants’ EM of LTBI influence preventive treatment? BACKGROUND: Multiple factors contribute to disproportionately higher rates of TB in US Latinos. Compared to non-Latino whites, Latinos are almost five times more likely to have TB. While more than 28,000 new TB cases have been reported in the US since 1984, there was a 77% increase in the Latino population. In 1999, Mexicans, a subgroup of Latinos, accounted for 23% of foreign-born with TB. In the US-Mexico border region, TB rates are higher than the interior of either country. Seventy five percent of the TB cases among Mexican-born persons in the US in 1999 were reported from the four US states bordering Mexico. The US-Mexico border represents a geographic area with a growing pool of immigrants in whom active disease will continue to develop unless culturally relevant, effective strategies are developed to promote successful completion of preventive treatment for LTBI. METHODS: Using a critical ethnographic methodology, a purposive sampling technique was used to select Mexican immigrants (N=9; 7 women & 2 men) diagnosed with LTBI and their spouses (N=5). Multiple data collection methods were used including multiple in depth interviews with each participant. Data analysis included review of transcripts, data reduction, and the inductive generation of categories, domains, and cultural themes. FINDINGS: The influence of the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of the US-Mexico border on immigrants’ EM of LTBI will be discussed. Three cultural themes abstracted from the data that capture the essence of the experience of LTBI for Mexican immigrants at the US-Mexico border will be presented: (1) Conflicting EMs, (2) Reconstructing a popular EM of TB, and (3) The stakes are high. IMPLICATIONS: This study responds to the IOM elimination of TB research priority for understanding LTBI. Illuminating the Mexican immigrants’ EM of LTBI within the US-Mexico border will inform future culturally relevant interventions aimed at reducing health disparities in Mexican immigrants at the US-Mexico border and, ultimately eliminating TB in the U.S. Acknowledgement. Funded by a NINR Fellowship NR07697
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleColliding Explanatory Models: Mexican Immigrants’ LTBI Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158100-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Colliding Explanatory Models: Mexican Immigrants&rsquo; LTBI Experience </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McEwen, M., PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona, CON, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AR, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">AIMS: The specific aims of this study were to: (1) illicit the Mexican immigrants&rsquo; explanatory model (EM) of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and tuberculosis disease (TB) and, (2) illuminate the influence of their EM on preventive treatment for LTBI. Research questions were: (1) What is the immigrants&rsquo; EM of LTBI? (2) What are the points of congruence and departure between the immigrants&rsquo; EM of LTBI and the US and Mexico professional EM of LTBI? (3) How does the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of the US-Mexico border influence the immigrants&rsquo; EM of LTBI? (4) How does the Mexican immigrants&rsquo; EM of LTBI influence preventive treatment? BACKGROUND: Multiple factors contribute to disproportionately higher rates of TB in US Latinos. Compared to non-Latino whites, Latinos are almost five times more likely to have TB. While more than 28,000 new TB cases have been reported in the US since 1984, there was a 77% increase in the Latino population. In 1999, Mexicans, a subgroup of Latinos, accounted for 23% of foreign-born with TB. In the US-Mexico border region, TB rates are higher than the interior of either country. Seventy five percent of the TB cases among Mexican-born persons in the US in 1999 were reported from the four US states bordering Mexico. The US-Mexico border represents a geographic area with a growing pool of immigrants in whom active disease will continue to develop unless culturally relevant, effective strategies are developed to promote successful completion of preventive treatment for LTBI. METHODS: Using a critical ethnographic methodology, a purposive sampling technique was used to select Mexican immigrants (N=9; 7 women &amp; 2 men) diagnosed with LTBI and their spouses (N=5). Multiple data collection methods were used including multiple in depth interviews with each participant. Data analysis included review of transcripts, data reduction, and the inductive generation of categories, domains, and cultural themes. FINDINGS: The influence of the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of the US-Mexico border on immigrants&rsquo; EM of LTBI will be discussed. Three cultural themes abstracted from the data that capture the essence of the experience of LTBI for Mexican immigrants at the US-Mexico border will be presented: (1) Conflicting EMs, (2) Reconstructing a popular EM of TB, and (3) The stakes are high. IMPLICATIONS: This study responds to the IOM elimination of TB research priority for understanding LTBI. Illuminating the Mexican immigrants&rsquo; EM of LTBI within the US-Mexico border will inform future culturally relevant interventions aimed at reducing health disparities in Mexican immigrants at the US-Mexico border and, ultimately eliminating TB in the U.S. Acknowledgement. Funded by a NINR Fellowship NR07697</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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