2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158101
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Natural History of the Menopausal Transition: A Longitudinal Study
Abstract:
The Natural History of the Menopausal Transition: A Longitudinal Study
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Mitchell, Ellen, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:University of Washington , School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA
Overview: The menopausal transition (MT) is an important time of a woman's life when many changes occur. Only recently has attention been given to this phase of life by the scientific community. Questions that arise about the transition often concern symptoms, hormonal changes and menstrual bleeding. Fourteen years ago the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (SMWHS) was initiated to study the natural history of the MT with a focus on hormone changes, symptoms, bleeding patterns and stress. Today, this longitudinal study continues to collect data from some of the same women who entered the study fourteen years ago. The purpose of this symposium is to present some of the most recent findings from the SMWHS. The focus of these four papers is on hormonal levels, patterns of change in symptoms across the MT, genetic influences on the MT, and the important methodological issue of retrospective versus prospective data collection about menstrual cycle changes. A key issue when planning a study involving the menstrual cycle is whether to ask women retrospectively about changes or to obtain these data from prospectively kept menstrual calendars. This latter approach is more time consuming and costly than the former. Ms. Kathleen Smith-DiJulio addresses this issue in the first paper. She presents findings comparing retrospective self reports of skipped periods with prospectively kept menstrual calendars. Many people refer to the menopausal transition as a time when emotional symptoms develop. Conflicting evidence exists about this issue. No study observed specific patterns of depressed mood during MT until Dr. Anne Mariella began this work with her dissertation about patterns of yearly reports of depressed mood. Building on this work, Dr. Mariella, in the second paper, presents findings about patterns of monthly self reports of depressed mood during the MT. Staging the MT is a recent development in this field which enables a more precise study of this phase of a woman's life. The SMWHS developed criteria for staging based upon changes in menstrual bleeding patterns. These criteria are reported in Menopause, 20001. Using this approach we can describe changes across these stages to obtain a much richer picture of the natural history of the MT. One of the many questions concerning the MT is whether a woman's genetic makeup plays a role in the events that occur during MT. Dr. Mitchell, in the third paper, addresses genetic influences on estrone levels during each stage, as well as the genetic influences on age of onset and duration of each stage. Finally, as we try to better understand the MT it is important to examine relationships among the various key hormones. Dr. Woods, in the fourth paper, presents findings about cortisol level for each stage of the transition and the relationship of cortisol levels to FSH and estrone. 1Mitchell, E. S., Woods, N. F., & Mariella, A. M. (2000). Three stages of the menopausal transition from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study: toward a more precise definition. Menopause, 7(5), 334-349.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Natural History of the Menopausal Transition: A Longitudinal Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158101-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Natural History of the Menopausal Transition: A Longitudinal Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, Ellen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Washington , School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Overview: The menopausal transition (MT) is an important time of a woman's life when many changes occur. Only recently has attention been given to this phase of life by the scientific community. Questions that arise about the transition often concern symptoms, hormonal changes and menstrual bleeding. Fourteen years ago the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (SMWHS) was initiated to study the natural history of the MT with a focus on hormone changes, symptoms, bleeding patterns and stress. Today, this longitudinal study continues to collect data from some of the same women who entered the study fourteen years ago. The purpose of this symposium is to present some of the most recent findings from the SMWHS. The focus of these four papers is on hormonal levels, patterns of change in symptoms across the MT, genetic influences on the MT, and the important methodological issue of retrospective versus prospective data collection about menstrual cycle changes. A key issue when planning a study involving the menstrual cycle is whether to ask women retrospectively about changes or to obtain these data from prospectively kept menstrual calendars. This latter approach is more time consuming and costly than the former. Ms. Kathleen Smith-DiJulio addresses this issue in the first paper. She presents findings comparing retrospective self reports of skipped periods with prospectively kept menstrual calendars. Many people refer to the menopausal transition as a time when emotional symptoms develop. Conflicting evidence exists about this issue. No study observed specific patterns of depressed mood during MT until Dr. Anne Mariella began this work with her dissertation about patterns of yearly reports of depressed mood. Building on this work, Dr. Mariella, in the second paper, presents findings about patterns of monthly self reports of depressed mood during the MT. Staging the MT is a recent development in this field which enables a more precise study of this phase of a woman's life. The SMWHS developed criteria for staging based upon changes in menstrual bleeding patterns. These criteria are reported in Menopause, 20001. Using this approach we can describe changes across these stages to obtain a much richer picture of the natural history of the MT. One of the many questions concerning the MT is whether a woman's genetic makeup plays a role in the events that occur during MT. Dr. Mitchell, in the third paper, addresses genetic influences on estrone levels during each stage, as well as the genetic influences on age of onset and duration of each stage. Finally, as we try to better understand the MT it is important to examine relationships among the various key hormones. Dr. Woods, in the fourth paper, presents findings about cortisol level for each stage of the transition and the relationship of cortisol levels to FSH and estrone. 1Mitchell, E. S., Woods, N. F., &amp; Mariella, A. M. (2000). Three stages of the menopausal transition from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study: toward a more precise definition. Menopause, 7(5), 334-349. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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