2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158102
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Genetic Influences on Menopausal Transition Stages and Estrone Levels
Abstract:
Genetic Influences on Menopausal Transition Stages and Estrone Levels
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Mitchell, Ellen, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:University of Washington , School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA
Co-Authors:Mariella, A; Woods, NF; Stapleton, PL; Farin, FM; Viernes, HMA
Introduction: Great interest exists today in understanding the years before menopause called the menopausal transition (MT) including the duration of MT and the age of onset. Also of interest are factors that influence hormone levels, and the timing and age of onset of the MT stages. Two studies have addressed age of onset and duration of MT but either enrolled participants at an age when MT may have already begun or did not use any staging system to distinguish between different phases of MT. No study has described genetic polymorphisms that might influence onset and duration of MT stage or estrone levels. Purpose: The 3 purposes of this study were 1) to determine age of onset of Middle and Late stages of MT and final menstrual period (FMP), 2) the duration of Middle and Late stages of MT and 3) to identify group differences among genetic variants of the estrogen receptor gene (ESR PvuII) and ESR (Xbal), of CYP17 (T-C substitution) and of CYP19 (C-T substitution) for age of onset of stage and FMP, duration of stage and urinary estrone level within stage. Methods: 89 women with an identifiable onset of either Middle or Late MT or FMP, on no estrogen or progestin, and from whom urinary estrone and DNA were available were studied. This study was part of a longitudinal study about MT ongoing since 1990. Estrone levels were from first morning urine specimens collected in the early follicular phase between late 1996 thru 2001. Stage of MT was determined using staging criteria developed by the investigators and applied to menstrual calendars. Age at onset, duration of stage and mean levels for estrone for each stage were identified. DNA was obtained from buccal cell smears for analysis of the polymorphisms. ANOVA was done for group differences among the 3 variants for each polymorphism (ESR, CYP17, CYP19). Results: The mean duration of Middle stage was 3.2 years, for Late stage 2.5 years, mean age of onset of Middle stage was 46 years, for Late stage 48.5 years and for FMP it was 51 years with a wide range for all stages. When 3 genetic variations (wild type, heterogeneous, variant form) for each polymorphism were examined for duration and age of onset of stage and for estrone level within stage the only significant group differences were for duration of Late stage for CYP19 and for CYP17 for estrone level during Late stage. Those with the wild type for CYP19 had a longer duration in Late stage (4.3 years) than those with the heterogeneous (2.3 years) or variant form (1.8 years) (F4.3, df 2/25, .p .025). Those with the wild type for CYP17 had a higher level of estrone only during Late stage than those with the heterogeneous type (F4.3, df 2/39, p .02). Implications: Age of onset of FMP as 51 years supports all earlier work. Knowledge of average duration and age onset of MT stages can be used when counseling midlife women about what to expect during MT. These two genetic influences during Late stage indicate a possible genetic influence on skipped periods preceding FMP. Understanding genetic influences may help health professionals better understand changes occurring during this time of life. Funding Sources: NINR R01-NR04141; NINR P30 NR04001; NIEHS ES-07-33
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGenetic Influences on Menopausal Transition Stages and Estrone Levelsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158102-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Genetic Influences on Menopausal Transition Stages and Estrone Levels</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mitchell, Ellen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Washington , School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mariella, A; Woods, NF; Stapleton, PL; Farin, FM; Viernes, HMA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Great interest exists today in understanding the years before menopause called the menopausal transition (MT) including the duration of MT and the age of onset. Also of interest are factors that influence hormone levels, and the timing and age of onset of the MT stages. Two studies have addressed age of onset and duration of MT but either enrolled participants at an age when MT may have already begun or did not use any staging system to distinguish between different phases of MT. No study has described genetic polymorphisms that might influence onset and duration of MT stage or estrone levels. Purpose: The 3 purposes of this study were 1) to determine age of onset of Middle and Late stages of MT and final menstrual period (FMP), 2) the duration of Middle and Late stages of MT and 3) to identify group differences among genetic variants of the estrogen receptor gene (ESR PvuII) and ESR (Xbal), of CYP17 (T-C substitution) and of CYP19 (C-T substitution) for age of onset of stage and FMP, duration of stage and urinary estrone level within stage. Methods: 89 women with an identifiable onset of either Middle or Late MT or FMP, on no estrogen or progestin, and from whom urinary estrone and DNA were available were studied. This study was part of a longitudinal study about MT ongoing since 1990. Estrone levels were from first morning urine specimens collected in the early follicular phase between late 1996 thru 2001. Stage of MT was determined using staging criteria developed by the investigators and applied to menstrual calendars. Age at onset, duration of stage and mean levels for estrone for each stage were identified. DNA was obtained from buccal cell smears for analysis of the polymorphisms. ANOVA was done for group differences among the 3 variants for each polymorphism (ESR, CYP17, CYP19). Results: The mean duration of Middle stage was 3.2 years, for Late stage 2.5 years, mean age of onset of Middle stage was 46 years, for Late stage 48.5 years and for FMP it was 51 years with a wide range for all stages. When 3 genetic variations (wild type, heterogeneous, variant form) for each polymorphism were examined for duration and age of onset of stage and for estrone level within stage the only significant group differences were for duration of Late stage for CYP19 and for CYP17 for estrone level during Late stage. Those with the wild type for CYP19 had a longer duration in Late stage (4.3 years) than those with the heterogeneous (2.3 years) or variant form (1.8 years) (F4.3, df 2/25, .p .025). Those with the wild type for CYP17 had a higher level of estrone only during Late stage than those with the heterogeneous type (F4.3, df 2/39, p .02). Implications: Age of onset of FMP as 51 years supports all earlier work. Knowledge of average duration and age onset of MT stages can be used when counseling midlife women about what to expect during MT. These two genetic influences during Late stage indicate a possible genetic influence on skipped periods preceding FMP. Understanding genetic influences may help health professionals better understand changes occurring during this time of life. Funding Sources: NINR R01-NR04141; NINR P30 NR04001; NIEHS ES-07-33 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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