2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158103
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Irregularities Related to Patient Non-Adherence
Abstract:
Medication Irregularities Related to Patient Non-Adherence
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Mullette, Elizabeth, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University - Bozeman
Contact Address:, Billings, MT, USA
Problem: A lack of medication adherence has been identified as a problem for the aging population of the United States. The elderly population is faced with an increasing burden of chronic diseases and a corresponding increase in their number of medications used. The associated increased complexity of medication regimens creates difficulties for the patient. Significant discrepancies have been found to exist between patient and provider regarding medications being taken. Patient problems with limited mobility may also affect medication self-administration and adherence. The purpose of this study was to examine medication irregularities associated with factors of patient non-adherence. Framework: See overview. Sample: Presently there are 149 subjects over 65 years of age, with a hospital stay>72 hours that have completed study interviews and medical records review. Mean age was 80+ 8 years, and 71% were female. Patients spend an average of $125/month for prescription medications at the time of hospital admission and $139/month after discharge. Methods: Patients and/or their families were interviewed about their medication use at hospital admission and discharge. Patients understanding of their medication action and dosage was compared to actual lists of medication prescribed. Findings: Patient issues that contributed to medication errors included prior outpatient non-adherence to medication regimen and difficulties in providing accurate medication list on at time of admission to the hospital. Adherence issues included taking the wrong dose or omitting a dose of medication (59%); taking an unauthorized drug (29%; and stopping a medication without first consulting a health care provider (12%. On discharge participants were on a greater number of prescription medications and medication doses and had a lower functional status. Self-reported medication costs increased following hospitalization. Both errors and potential errors increased or tended to increase with income level. However, this may be due to the low numbers of subjects who provided income information. Conclusions: Elderly persons may not be able to provide accurate medication information on hospital admission. On discharge they are on more medications which requires changes in their former medication regime. Understanding that patients that did not follow their regime prior to hospitalization are at greater risk or medication problems post discharge is important in care planning. Education about the medication including why the drug is being taken, when and how to take it as well as the proper dosage is necessary at discharge and subsequent follow up visits.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Irregularities Related to Patient Non-Adherenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158103-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Irregularities Related to Patient Non-Adherence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mullette, Elizabeth, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University - Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Billings, MT, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: A lack of medication adherence has been identified as a problem for the aging population of the United States. The elderly population is faced with an increasing burden of chronic diseases and a corresponding increase in their number of medications used. The associated increased complexity of medication regimens creates difficulties for the patient. Significant discrepancies have been found to exist between patient and provider regarding medications being taken. Patient problems with limited mobility may also affect medication self-administration and adherence. The purpose of this study was to examine medication irregularities associated with factors of patient non-adherence. Framework: See overview. Sample: Presently there are 149 subjects over 65 years of age, with a hospital stay&gt;72 hours that have completed study interviews and medical records review. Mean age was 80+ 8 years, and 71% were female. Patients spend an average of $125/month for prescription medications at the time of hospital admission and $139/month after discharge. Methods: Patients and/or their families were interviewed about their medication use at hospital admission and discharge. Patients understanding of their medication action and dosage was compared to actual lists of medication prescribed. Findings: Patient issues that contributed to medication errors included prior outpatient non-adherence to medication regimen and difficulties in providing accurate medication list on at time of admission to the hospital. Adherence issues included taking the wrong dose or omitting a dose of medication (59%); taking an unauthorized drug (29%; and stopping a medication without first consulting a health care provider (12%. On discharge participants were on a greater number of prescription medications and medication doses and had a lower functional status. Self-reported medication costs increased following hospitalization. Both errors and potential errors increased or tended to increase with income level. However, this may be due to the low numbers of subjects who provided income information. Conclusions: Elderly persons may not be able to provide accurate medication information on hospital admission. On discharge they are on more medications which requires changes in their former medication regime. Understanding that patients that did not follow their regime prior to hospitalization are at greater risk or medication problems post discharge is important in care planning. Education about the medication including why the drug is being taken, when and how to take it as well as the proper dosage is necessary at discharge and subsequent follow up visits.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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