2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158104
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do Responses of Elders to Surveys Vary by Level of Cognitive Impairment?
Abstract:
Do Responses of Elders to Surveys Vary by Level of Cognitive Impairment?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:O'Brien, Jeanette, RN,MSN, CS
Contact Address:6235 SW Burlingame Ave, #102, Portland, OR, 97239, USA
Co-Authors:Stewart, BJ; Archbold, PG; Fields, J; Hiatt, S; Lyons, KS; Perez, MD; Skinner, JT; Stasik, M; Tetz, K; Hornbrook, MC; O’Keeffe-Rosetti, M
Researchers in the area of family care have not adequately addressed the perspective of the elders receiving care. This may be because of the high prevalence of cognitive impairment (CI) and the belief that elders who are cognitively impaired are not able to provide reliable and valid information. Method. We analyzed data from 220 care receivers (CRs) who were members of a large group practice HMO and were systematically selected from referrals to the HMO’s home health agency. Using Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) impairment cutoffs, we grouped CRs into three categories: n=47 moderate-severe CI (MMSE=0-17), n=50 mild CI (MMSE=18-23), and n=123 no CI (MMSE=24-30). We interviewed CRs to obtain their responses to seven scales: difficulty in activities of daily living (ADL), difficulty in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), difficulty in mobility, positive affect, negative affect, quality of the caregiver’s role enactment, and mutuality. Altogether the seven scales included 61 items. We compared the three CI groups on: (a) extent of missing data, (b) mean scale scores, and (c) correspondence between CR self-ratings and caregiver proxy ratings on ADL and IADL difficulty. Results. CRs with moderate-severe CI had more missing data (M=26.2 of 61 possible items, SD=25.5) than either mild CI (M=5.5, SD=11.5) or no CI (M=1.0, SD=3.4). In terms of mean scale scores, the three CI groups were not significantly different on six of the seven scales; however CRs with moderate-severe CI reported that their CG’s role enactment was of lower quality than that reported by either mild CI or no CI. On the 0 to 3 ADL and IADL difficulty scales (0=no difficulty, 3=unable to do), CRs with mild or moderate-severe CI rated themselves as having less difficulty than their family caregivers. Discussion. While the amount of missing data increased with the level of CI, it appears that some CRs with moderate-severe CI are able to provide useful information and should not be excluded solely based on the presence of CI. The CR self-ratings of less ADL and IADL difficulty than caregiver proxy ratings are similar to other findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo Responses of Elders to Surveys Vary by Level of Cognitive Impairment?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158104-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Do Responses of Elders to Surveys Vary by Level of Cognitive Impairment? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Brien, Jeanette, RN,MSN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6235 SW Burlingame Ave, #102, Portland, OR, 97239, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Stewart, BJ; Archbold, PG; Fields, J; Hiatt, S; Lyons, KS; Perez, MD; Skinner, JT; Stasik, M; Tetz, K; Hornbrook, MC; O&rsquo;Keeffe-Rosetti, M </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Researchers in the area of family care have not adequately addressed the perspective of the elders receiving care. This may be because of the high prevalence of cognitive impairment (CI) and the belief that elders who are cognitively impaired are not able to provide reliable and valid information. Method. We analyzed data from 220 care receivers (CRs) who were members of a large group practice HMO and were systematically selected from referrals to the HMO&rsquo;s home health agency. Using Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) impairment cutoffs, we grouped CRs into three categories: n=47 moderate-severe CI (MMSE=0-17), n=50 mild CI (MMSE=18-23), and n=123 no CI (MMSE=24-30). We interviewed CRs to obtain their responses to seven scales: difficulty in activities of daily living (ADL), difficulty in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), difficulty in mobility, positive affect, negative affect, quality of the caregiver&rsquo;s role enactment, and mutuality. Altogether the seven scales included 61 items. We compared the three CI groups on: (a) extent of missing data, (b) mean scale scores, and (c) correspondence between CR self-ratings and caregiver proxy ratings on ADL and IADL difficulty. Results. CRs with moderate-severe CI had more missing data (M=26.2 of 61 possible items, SD=25.5) than either mild CI (M=5.5, SD=11.5) or no CI (M=1.0, SD=3.4). In terms of mean scale scores, the three CI groups were not significantly different on six of the seven scales; however CRs with moderate-severe CI reported that their CG&rsquo;s role enactment was of lower quality than that reported by either mild CI or no CI. On the 0 to 3 ADL and IADL difficulty scales (0=no difficulty, 3=unable to do), CRs with mild or moderate-severe CI rated themselves as having less difficulty than their family caregivers. Discussion. While the amount of missing data increased with the level of CI, it appears that some CRs with moderate-severe CI are able to provide useful information and should not be excluded solely based on the presence of CI. The CR self-ratings of less ADL and IADL difficulty than caregiver proxy ratings are similar to other findings. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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