2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158106
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educational Enrichment Activities and Critical Thinking
Abstract:
Educational Enrichment Activities and Critical Thinking
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Ravert, Patricia, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University College of Nursing
Contact Address:135 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Purpose: To determine the effect of two different educational enrichment experiences on critical thinking (disposition and skills) in a sample of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. The preferred learning styles of the students as a moderating factor was investigated as well. Rationale/Background: The American Association of Colleges of Nursing states in The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice that critical thinking is one of the core competencies in the preparation of professional nurses. Critical thinking instruments show an increase after critical thinking courses. Advanced technology is playing an increasingly role in nursing education, and use of high fidelity human patient simulators (HPS) are being incorporated curriculum. Manufacturers of simulators suggest use will enhance critical thinking. Small classroom discussions with problem discussion and analysis are thought to increase problem-solving, reasoning and critical thinking also. Methods: The targeted population was 64 nursing students in their 3rd semester during 2003 at a Midwestern private university. Of the 28 who volunteered and signed informed consents, 25 students completed all study requirements. The study was an instructional development project with enrichment activities with pre and post critical thinking instruments (California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and California Critical Thinking Skills Test). The participants were stratified (by learning style) and randomly assigned to one of two enrichment activity groups. Both enrichment experiences involved the same patient scenarios, and were taught by the Principal Investigator and Research Assistants trained in the both enrichment activities. One enrichment activity group used the human patient simulator (HPS) to simulate actual patient problems and participants performed the nursing actions. The second enrichment activity group only discussed the patient scenarios. Outcomes: A one-way analysis of variance was conducted to evaluate the relationship between enrichment activities and gain critical thinking scores (disposition and skills) scores. The dependent variables were the gain scores and the covariates were the pre-scores. Neither of the enrichment groups had significant gain in critical thinking disposition total or subscale gain scores. However, significant critical thinking skills total gain scores were noted, F = (7, 17) = 20.74, p = .00. However, the gains were not predicted by learning style or group. The critical thinking skills subscale scores showed similar significant gains. Implications: Both enrichment groups showed an increase in critical thinking skill scores; however the HPS group was more enthused about learning and expressed a desire for further sessions. The simulator participants expressed “learning by doing” was helpful and they felt more confident in caring for patients. Further investigation with a sample of students who do not receive enrichment activities is necessary to determine if the observed gain can be attributed to the enrichment activities or time in school.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducational Enrichment Activities and Critical Thinkingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158106-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Educational Enrichment Activities and Critical Thinking</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ravert, Patricia, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">135 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To determine the effect of two different educational enrichment experiences on critical thinking (disposition and skills) in a sample of undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. The preferred learning styles of the students as a moderating factor was investigated as well. Rationale/Background: The American Association of Colleges of Nursing states in The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice that critical thinking is one of the core competencies in the preparation of professional nurses. Critical thinking instruments show an increase after critical thinking courses. Advanced technology is playing an increasingly role in nursing education, and use of high fidelity human patient simulators (HPS) are being incorporated curriculum. Manufacturers of simulators suggest use will enhance critical thinking. Small classroom discussions with problem discussion and analysis are thought to increase problem-solving, reasoning and critical thinking also. Methods: The targeted population was 64 nursing students in their 3rd semester during 2003 at a Midwestern private university. Of the 28 who volunteered and signed informed consents, 25 students completed all study requirements. The study was an instructional development project with enrichment activities with pre and post critical thinking instruments (California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory and California Critical Thinking Skills Test). The participants were stratified (by learning style) and randomly assigned to one of two enrichment activity groups. Both enrichment experiences involved the same patient scenarios, and were taught by the Principal Investigator and Research Assistants trained in the both enrichment activities. One enrichment activity group used the human patient simulator (HPS) to simulate actual patient problems and participants performed the nursing actions. The second enrichment activity group only discussed the patient scenarios. Outcomes: A one-way analysis of variance was conducted to evaluate the relationship between enrichment activities and gain critical thinking scores (disposition and skills) scores. The dependent variables were the gain scores and the covariates were the pre-scores. Neither of the enrichment groups had significant gain in critical thinking disposition total or subscale gain scores. However, significant critical thinking skills total gain scores were noted, F = (7, 17) = 20.74, p = .00. However, the gains were not predicted by learning style or group. The critical thinking skills subscale scores showed similar significant gains. Implications: Both enrichment groups showed an increase in critical thinking skill scores; however the HPS group was more enthused about learning and expressed a desire for further sessions. The simulator participants expressed &ldquo;learning by doing&rdquo; was helpful and they felt more confident in caring for patients. Further investigation with a sample of students who do not receive enrichment activities is necessary to determine if the observed gain can be attributed to the enrichment activities or time in school.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:30:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:30:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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