2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158109
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Data Collection Methods for Workplace Violence in Long-Haul Truck Drivers
Abstract:
Data Collection Methods for Workplace Violence in Long-Haul Truck Drivers
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Riley, Peggy, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky, College of Nursing
Contact Address:551 CON/HSLC, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA
Co-Authors:Debra Gay Anderson, PhD, RN
The purpose of this poster is to describe the data collection process and the preliminary data from a survey of long-haul truckers. Data is being collected at truck shows and truck stops across the United States. Initial data via surveys with long-haul truck drivers (n=1400). Participation in the survey and interview process is voluntary. Once a long-haul truck driver with a valid CDL license is identified, he or she signs a consent form in the presence of the interviewer. The survey deals with several aspects of the driver’s life, including: demographics, number of hours driven per day/week/year, driving partners, sexual assault/harassment, physical assault/harassment, and domestic violence with intimate driving partners. Personal interviews at truck stops and truck shows have revealed some common themes. Participants express gratitude for “someone taking an interest in a truck driver”; “it feels like one cares what happens to us as truck driver”; “our jobs take us away from home and family and we are sometimes placed in dangerous situations. One interview at a truck stop revealed a driver that was homeless except for his truck. He reported driving extremely long hours, stopping only to sleep. He also reported random acts of violence that had occurred while driving in strange towns. One incident left the driver outside his truck, in a ditch, with a concussion. Another driver interviewed at a truck show revealed he also drove long hours. He asked, “Do you want me to report what I actually drive or what I am supposed to drive?” He further stated, “If you don’t drive longer than the law allows, you won’t have a job for very long.” A common theme that has emerged from interviews is being approached by prostitutes at truck stops and at delivery sites. This theme was common among most of the drivers interviewed. They stated that almost as soon as they pulled into the truck stop or as soon as they tried to sleep in their trucks women approached them for “sexual favors.” They stated they are “professionals and want to be treated as professionals.” In addition to the surveys, truckers who have agreed will be interviewed via phone calls to obtain in-depth information regarding violent episodes they reported in the surveys. Data collection will continue through 2004. This research study is supported by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Grant #R01 OHO7931.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleData Collection Methods for Workplace Violence in Long-Haul Truck Driversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158109-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Data Collection Methods for Workplace Violence in Long-Haul Truck Drivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riley, Peggy, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">551 CON/HSLC, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra Gay Anderson, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this poster is to describe the data collection process and the preliminary data from a survey of long-haul truckers. Data is being collected at truck shows and truck stops across the United States. Initial data via surveys with long-haul truck drivers (n=1400). Participation in the survey and interview process is voluntary. Once a long-haul truck driver with a valid CDL license is identified, he or she signs a consent form in the presence of the interviewer. The survey deals with several aspects of the driver&rsquo;s life, including: demographics, number of hours driven per day/week/year, driving partners, sexual assault/harassment, physical assault/harassment, and domestic violence with intimate driving partners. Personal interviews at truck stops and truck shows have revealed some common themes. Participants express gratitude for &ldquo;someone taking an interest in a truck driver&rdquo;; &ldquo;it feels like one cares what happens to us as truck driver&rdquo;; &ldquo;our jobs take us away from home and family and we are sometimes placed in dangerous situations. One interview at a truck stop revealed a driver that was homeless except for his truck. He reported driving extremely long hours, stopping only to sleep. He also reported random acts of violence that had occurred while driving in strange towns. One incident left the driver outside his truck, in a ditch, with a concussion. Another driver interviewed at a truck show revealed he also drove long hours. He asked, &ldquo;Do you want me to report what I actually drive or what I am supposed to drive?&rdquo; He further stated, &ldquo;If you don&rsquo;t drive longer than the law allows, you won&rsquo;t have a job for very long.&rdquo; A common theme that has emerged from interviews is being approached by prostitutes at truck stops and at delivery sites. This theme was common among most of the drivers interviewed. They stated that almost as soon as they pulled into the truck stop or as soon as they tried to sleep in their trucks women approached them for &ldquo;sexual favors.&rdquo; They stated they are &ldquo;professionals and want to be treated as professionals.&rdquo; In addition to the surveys, truckers who have agreed will be interviewed via phone calls to obtain in-depth information regarding violent episodes they reported in the surveys. Data collection will continue through 2004. This research study is supported by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Grant #R01 OHO7931. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:31:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:31:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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