2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158110
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DSM-IV Characteristic Symptoms Typical for Adolescents with Schizophrenia
Abstract:
DSM-IV Characteristic Symptoms Typical for Adolescents with Schizophrenia
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Schepp, Karen, PhD, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:Dept. of Psychosocial & Community Health, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Kennedy, M, PhD, ARNP; Tsai, H-C, PhD, ARNP, CS; Davidson, B, MN, ARNP; Paulino, J, BA
Specific Aim: The purpose of this paper is to describe common characteristic symptoms endorsed by adolescents with schizophrenia. A second purpose is to compare the characteristic symptoms identified by parents with those endorsed by adolescents. Background: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Ed 4., Text Revision of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV-TR) lists characteristic symptoms as one category of criteria for making the diagnosis of schizophrenia. The characteristic symptoms are 1) delusions, 2) hallucinations, 3) disorganized speech, 4) grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior, and 5) negative symptoms. The presence of these characteristic symptoms is particularly important in screening adolescents for the Family Centered Program for Adolescents with Schizophrenia, an NIMH funded 5-year symptom management intervention program based on self-regulation theory. Method: Data reported in this paper are from the screening procedure for this randomized clinical trial. The screening was conducted using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Child and Adolescent version (K-SADS) which is an extensive diagnostic interview inventory. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for the diagnostic interviews remained above 95% for all cases. Separate interviews were conducted with adolescents and their parents. Forty four (44) adolescents between the ages of 15-19 (mean=17.2 years) screened positive for schizophrenia. Thirty-four (34) of the adolescents were male and 10 were female. The sample was ethnically diverse, with 22 (50%) Asian, African-American, Hispanic, multiracial or American Indian and 22 (50%) White/Euro American. Findings & Implications: The findings showed most common categories of symptoms endorsed by the adolescents were hallucinations (n=41 or 93%of the adolescents), i.e. command hallucinations, conversing voices, or running commentaries. Delusions, including thought broadcasting and grandiosity were also common (n=41 or 93%). Other categories of symptoms include disorganized speech (n=6 or 15%), disorganized or catatonic behavior (n=3, 7%) and negative symptoms (n=7, 16%). An important finding showed parents report the adolescents were experiencing more command hallucinations than the youth. This is a clinically significant finding because command hallucinations are extremely serious. The voices are often telling the adolescent to harm him/herself or others. The adolescents may be afraid or hesitant to admit to these commands. Data from parents along with the data from the adolescents are essential when conducting a thorough diagnostic assessment. Effective symptom management programs require specific individualized information about the hallucinations and delusions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDSM-IV Characteristic Symptoms Typical for Adolescents with Schizophreniaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158110-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">DSM-IV Characteristic Symptoms Typical for Adolescents with Schizophrenia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schepp, Karen, PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Dept. of Psychosocial &amp; Community Health, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kennedy, M, PhD, ARNP; Tsai, H-C, PhD, ARNP, CS; Davidson, B, MN, ARNP; Paulino, J, BA </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aim: The purpose of this paper is to describe common characteristic symptoms endorsed by adolescents with schizophrenia. A second purpose is to compare the characteristic symptoms identified by parents with those endorsed by adolescents. Background: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Ed 4., Text Revision of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV-TR) lists characteristic symptoms as one category of criteria for making the diagnosis of schizophrenia. The characteristic symptoms are 1) delusions, 2) hallucinations, 3) disorganized speech, 4) grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior, and 5) negative symptoms. The presence of these characteristic symptoms is particularly important in screening adolescents for the Family Centered Program for Adolescents with Schizophrenia, an NIMH funded 5-year symptom management intervention program based on self-regulation theory. Method: Data reported in this paper are from the screening procedure for this randomized clinical trial. The screening was conducted using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Child and Adolescent version (K-SADS) which is an extensive diagnostic interview inventory. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for the diagnostic interviews remained above 95% for all cases. Separate interviews were conducted with adolescents and their parents. Forty four (44) adolescents between the ages of 15-19 (mean=17.2 years) screened positive for schizophrenia. Thirty-four (34) of the adolescents were male and 10 were female. The sample was ethnically diverse, with 22 (50%) Asian, African-American, Hispanic, multiracial or American Indian and 22 (50%) White/Euro American. Findings &amp; Implications: The findings showed most common categories of symptoms endorsed by the adolescents were hallucinations (n=41 or 93%of the adolescents), i.e. command hallucinations, conversing voices, or running commentaries. Delusions, including thought broadcasting and grandiosity were also common (n=41 or 93%). Other categories of symptoms include disorganized speech (n=6 or 15%), disorganized or catatonic behavior (n=3, 7%) and negative symptoms (n=7, 16%). An important finding showed parents report the adolescents were experiencing more command hallucinations than the youth. This is a clinically significant finding because command hallucinations are extremely serious. The voices are often telling the adolescent to harm him/herself or others. The adolescents may be afraid or hesitant to admit to these commands. Data from parents along with the data from the adolescents are essential when conducting a thorough diagnostic assessment. Effective symptom management programs require specific individualized information about the hallucinations and delusions. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:31:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:31:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.