2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158112
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of an Intervention on Sleep States in Irritable Infants
Abstract:
The Impact of an Intervention on Sleep States in Irritable Infants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Smith, Sandra, PhD, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah College of Nursing
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105, USA
Statement of the Problem: Irritable infants have been described as having difficulty getting to sleep, being more easily disturbed, and spending less time in quiet sleep than non-irritable infants. Theoretical Framework: Infant irritability is defined as a behavior disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of fussiness, crying, restlessness, diminished soothability, inability to fall asleep, and increased sensitivity to stimuli. An active intervention strategy, the REST routine, was developed and tested with families with irritable infants. Four concepts guide REST Routine intervention for the infants. These include; regulation, entrainment, structure and touch. This presentation focuses on the strategies used to improved sleeping and state regulation in the infants and the outcomes sleep organization and stability of sleep states. Description of the Sample: 164 healthy full-term infants with ‘colic’ between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks were recruited and retained into the study. 83 infants had complete sleep files for analysis. Infants were randomized into the experimental or control group at study entry. A third post test only group was also included to assess for the Hawthorne effect. 26 babies were from the Charleston, S.C. area and 57 babies were from the Denver metropolitan area. Participants were predominately Caucasian middle, upper income families. There were no significant differences in demographic variables among groups except for gender (X2 = 6.9, p = 0.0318) in which females outnumbered males 46 to 37. Methods: Sleep data were acquired at 128 Hz via a sensor motility mattress to a PCMCIA card in a modified ambulatory cardiac monitor. Data were downloaded to a PC and analyzed using a previously described computer algorithm. Amount of quiet sleep (QS), active sleep (AS), and indeterminate sleep (IS) within and among the groups will be presented. State stability as measured by variability around start time of the longest nights sleep will also be presented. Results & Implications: Infants in the experimental group spent 32 % time in QS and 64% time in AS at baseline. Time in QS increased to 41% & AS decreased to 54% eight weeks after the rest routine. Infants in the control group spent 26% time in QS and 69% time in AS at baseline. Time in QS increased to 38% & time in AS decreased to 59% eight weeks after study entry. Time in IS ranged between 2.7 and 5% and was not significantly different among groups. There were no significant differences between the experimental and control groups in percent of time in QS, AS, or IS states pre and post test. There was a significant time effect with infants in both groups having significantly more time in QS (F = 7.81, p = .0064) & less time in AS (F = 6.96, p = .0099) at post test. Time in quiet sleep increased across time and may be a maturation phenomenon. Understanding the role of regularly scheduled naps and bedtime sleep rituals in promoting infant state stability requires further analysis. The challenges encountered in using a motion sensor mattress to acquire sleep data in the home and efforts to capturing 4 consecutive 24-hour periods of in-crib sleep data will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of an Intervention on Sleep States in Irritable Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158112-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of an Intervention on Sleep States in Irritable Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Sandra, PhD, APRN </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84105, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem: Irritable infants have been described as having difficulty getting to sleep, being more easily disturbed, and spending less time in quiet sleep than non-irritable infants. Theoretical Framework: Infant irritability is defined as a behavior disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of fussiness, crying, restlessness, diminished soothability, inability to fall asleep, and increased sensitivity to stimuli. An active intervention strategy, the REST routine, was developed and tested with families with irritable infants. Four concepts guide REST Routine intervention for the infants. These include; regulation, entrainment, structure and touch. This presentation focuses on the strategies used to improved sleeping and state regulation in the infants and the outcomes sleep organization and stability of sleep states. Description of the Sample: 164 healthy full-term infants with &lsquo;colic&rsquo; between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks were recruited and retained into the study. 83 infants had complete sleep files for analysis. Infants were randomized into the experimental or control group at study entry. A third post test only group was also included to assess for the Hawthorne effect. 26 babies were from the Charleston, S.C. area and 57 babies were from the Denver metropolitan area. Participants were predominately Caucasian middle, upper income families. There were no significant differences in demographic variables among groups except for gender (X2 = 6.9, p = 0.0318) in which females outnumbered males 46 to 37. Methods: Sleep data were acquired at 128 Hz via a sensor motility mattress to a PCMCIA card in a modified ambulatory cardiac monitor. Data were downloaded to a PC and analyzed using a previously described computer algorithm. Amount of quiet sleep (QS), active sleep (AS), and indeterminate sleep (IS) within and among the groups will be presented. State stability as measured by variability around start time of the longest nights sleep will also be presented. Results &amp; Implications: Infants in the experimental group spent 32 % time in QS and 64% time in AS at baseline. Time in QS increased to 41% &amp; AS decreased to 54% eight weeks after the rest routine. Infants in the control group spent 26% time in QS and 69% time in AS at baseline. Time in QS increased to 38% &amp; time in AS decreased to 59% eight weeks after study entry. Time in IS ranged between 2.7 and 5% and was not significantly different among groups. There were no significant differences between the experimental and control groups in percent of time in QS, AS, or IS states pre and post test. There was a significant time effect with infants in both groups having significantly more time in QS (F = 7.81, p = .0064) &amp; less time in AS (F = 6.96, p = .0099) at post test. Time in quiet sleep increased across time and may be a maturation phenomenon. Understanding the role of regularly scheduled naps and bedtime sleep rituals in promoting infant state stability requires further analysis. The challenges encountered in using a motion sensor mattress to acquire sleep data in the home and efforts to capturing 4 consecutive 24-hour periods of in-crib sleep data will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:31:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:31:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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