2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158115
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Couples Miscarriage Healing Project
Abstract:
The Couples Miscarriage Healing Project
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Swanson, Kristen, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:Department of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA
Overview: It is conservatively estimated that 1 in 6 pregnancies end in miscarriage, the spontaneous abortion of pregnancy prior to 20 weeks gestation. Women’s responses range from relief to devastation with resolution taking from days to years. Men, while far less studied, are described as feeling powerless to protect and support their partners through an uncontrollable event, sad about lost expectations, and likely to suppress their feelings. It has been consistently demonstrated that after miscarriage women wish to discuss their loss and share it with their partners. Yet, 85% of couples share their feelings about miscarriage to only a limited degree, if at all. At six months post miscarriage, women experiencing the most depression are least likely to have mates willing to discuss the loss; by one year they are most likely to have marital conflict. The purpose of the Couples Miscarriage Healing Project (CMHP) is to compare the effects of nurse caring (3 nurse counseling sessions), self-caring (3 home-delivered videotapes and journals), combined caring (1 nurse counseling plus 3 videotapes and journals) and no intervention (control) on the emotional healing, integration of loss, and couple well-being of women and their partners (husbands or male mates) in the first year after miscarrying. All intervention materials are based on Swanson’s middle-range caring theory and Meaning of Miscarriage Model. Both frameworks were phenomenologically derived and subsequently applied and tested in the Miscarriage Caring Project (MCP), a randomized trial of the effects of 3 caring-based nurse counseling sessions on women’s emotional well-being and integration of loss in the first year after miscarriage. In this symposium, we focus on our baseline data and describe the toll miscarriage has taken on the first 112 couples enrolled. All couples were enrolled within 12 weeks of loss (M=3.6; SD=2.9). Danuta Wojnar explores how couples’ rating of their pre-loss relationship is associated with their perceptions of each other’s ability to offer support and caring after miscarriage as well as their satisfaction with support from others. Anthippy Petras discusses an issue that we resolved with the advice of our Data Safety and Monitoring Board related to determining how much sadness is too much sadness after miscarriage and defining a meaningful CESD score for triggering follow up for risk of depression and suicide. Kristen Swanson describes the capacity of a path analysis model, based on the Lazarus Emotions and Adaptation Paradigm, to predict levels of depression and grief in men and women during the first few weeks post miscarriage. Rosalie Houston and Susan Altenhofen phenomenologically analyzed clinical field notes to interpret differences in men and women’s perceptions of what was lost and gained through miscarriage. Lastly, Hsien-Tzu Chen describes strategies employed to monitor the integrity of our application of the caring theory in the nurse counseling intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Couples Miscarriage Healing Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158115-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Couples Miscarriage Healing Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Swanson, Kristen, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Overview: It is conservatively estimated that 1 in 6 pregnancies end in miscarriage, the spontaneous abortion of pregnancy prior to 20 weeks gestation. Women&rsquo;s responses range from relief to devastation with resolution taking from days to years. Men, while far less studied, are described as feeling powerless to protect and support their partners through an uncontrollable event, sad about lost expectations, and likely to suppress their feelings. It has been consistently demonstrated that after miscarriage women wish to discuss their loss and share it with their partners. Yet, 85% of couples share their feelings about miscarriage to only a limited degree, if at all. At six months post miscarriage, women experiencing the most depression are least likely to have mates willing to discuss the loss; by one year they are most likely to have marital conflict. The purpose of the Couples Miscarriage Healing Project (CMHP) is to compare the effects of nurse caring (3 nurse counseling sessions), self-caring (3 home-delivered videotapes and journals), combined caring (1 nurse counseling plus 3 videotapes and journals) and no intervention (control) on the emotional healing, integration of loss, and couple well-being of women and their partners (husbands or male mates) in the first year after miscarrying. All intervention materials are based on Swanson&rsquo;s middle-range caring theory and Meaning of Miscarriage Model. Both frameworks were phenomenologically derived and subsequently applied and tested in the Miscarriage Caring Project (MCP), a randomized trial of the effects of 3 caring-based nurse counseling sessions on women&rsquo;s emotional well-being and integration of loss in the first year after miscarriage. In this symposium, we focus on our baseline data and describe the toll miscarriage has taken on the first 112 couples enrolled. All couples were enrolled within 12 weeks of loss (M=3.6; SD=2.9). Danuta Wojnar explores how couples&rsquo; rating of their pre-loss relationship is associated with their perceptions of each other&rsquo;s ability to offer support and caring after miscarriage as well as their satisfaction with support from others. Anthippy Petras discusses an issue that we resolved with the advice of our Data Safety and Monitoring Board related to determining how much sadness is too much sadness after miscarriage and defining a meaningful CESD score for triggering follow up for risk of depression and suicide. Kristen Swanson describes the capacity of a path analysis model, based on the Lazarus Emotions and Adaptation Paradigm, to predict levels of depression and grief in men and women during the first few weeks post miscarriage. Rosalie Houston and Susan Altenhofen phenomenologically analyzed clinical field notes to interpret differences in men and women&rsquo;s perceptions of what was lost and gained through miscarriage. Lastly, Hsien-Tzu Chen describes strategies employed to monitor the integrity of our application of the caring theory in the nurse counseling intervention. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:31:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:31:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.