2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158117
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tai Chi may be an Alternative to Traditional Exercise
Abstract:
Tai Chi may be an Alternative to Traditional Exercise
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Taylor, Ruth, RN, CNS, MN
P.I. Institution Name:Dept. of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing
Contact Address:University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA
Co-Authors:Erika Sivarajan Froelicher, RN, MPH, PhD, FAAN
Aim: To estimate the effect of Tai Chi on aerobic capacity. Background: Tai Chi exercise, though practiced in China for hundreds of years, has recently gained the attention of researchers in Western countries as a potential form of aerobic exercise. However, little analysis has been done on the aerobic benefits of Tai Chi exercise, important for cardiac populations. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted through a computerized search of seven databases, searching for the keywords Tai Chi, Tai Chi Chuan, Tai Chi Quan, Tai Ji, and Tai Ji Quan. A total of 16 study elements were appraised to determine a study quality score (possible range 0-32). D-STAT software was used to calculate the standardized mean differences (ES) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI), using means and standard deviations (SD) for the outcome measures of aerobic capacity. Results: A total of 441 citations were obtained, only 7 studies focused on Tai Chi exercise with aerobic capacity as an outcome variable (4 experimental & 3 cross-sectional). Mainly older adults participated (n=344); on average, men were 55.7 (SD=12.7) years old and women were 60.7 (SD= 6.2) years old. Study quality scores ranged from 22 to 28 (mean= 25.1, SD=2.0). The ES for the cross-sectional studies was large, while in the experimental studies the ES was small though not significant (Table 1). The largest effect on aerobic capacity was seen when subjects performed; classical Yang style Tai Chi (108 postures), a 52-week Tai Chi exercise intervention, and with sedentary subjects as comparisons. Implications: There is considerable scientific and clinical interest in Tai Chi exercise. Further research is needed that corrects on prior study design flaws and has a sufficient sample size, to definitively answer the question of Tai Chi efficacy. This meta-analysis suggests Tai Chi is a beneficial form of exercise, and provides information for sample size calculations. Table 1: Tai Chi Aerobic Capacity Effects Sizes and 95% Confidence Intervals Selected Group for Analysis ESLBCIUBCI Cross-sectional design 1861.01*+0.37+1.66 Experimental design 1580.33-0.41+1.07 Classical Yang style of Tai Chi 2241.10*+0.82+1.38 Sedentary comparisons 2530.80*+0.19+1.4152-week intervention 580.94*+0.06+1.81n = sample size, ES = effect size, LBCI = lower bound confidence interval, UBCI = upper bound confidence interval. n = sample size, ES = effect size, LBCI = lower bound confidence interval, UBCI = upper bound confidence interval. This research project was supported by a pre-doctoral training grant # 1 F31 NR08180-01 awarded to Ruth E. Taylor-Piliae from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTai Chi may be an Alternative to Traditional Exerciseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158117-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Tai Chi may be an Alternative to Traditional Exercise</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor, Ruth, RN, CNS, MN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dept. of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Erika Sivarajan Froelicher, RN, MPH, PhD, FAAN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: To estimate the effect of Tai Chi on aerobic capacity. Background: Tai Chi exercise, though practiced in China for hundreds of years, has recently gained the attention of researchers in Western countries as a potential form of aerobic exercise. However, little analysis has been done on the aerobic benefits of Tai Chi exercise, important for cardiac populations. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted through a computerized search of seven databases, searching for the keywords Tai Chi, Tai Chi Chuan, Tai Chi Quan, Tai Ji, and Tai Ji Quan. A total of 16 study elements were appraised to determine a study quality score (possible range 0-32). D-STAT software was used to calculate the standardized mean differences (ES) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI), using means and standard deviations (SD) for the outcome measures of aerobic capacity. Results: A total of 441 citations were obtained, only 7 studies focused on Tai Chi exercise with aerobic capacity as an outcome variable (4 experimental &amp; 3 cross-sectional). Mainly older adults participated (n=344); on average, men were 55.7 (SD=12.7) years old and women were 60.7 (SD= 6.2) years old. Study quality scores ranged from 22 to 28 (mean= 25.1, SD=2.0). The ES for the cross-sectional studies was large, while in the experimental studies the ES was small though not significant (Table 1). The largest effect on aerobic capacity was seen when subjects performed; classical Yang style Tai Chi (108 postures), a 52-week Tai Chi exercise intervention, and with sedentary subjects as comparisons. Implications: There is considerable scientific and clinical interest in Tai Chi exercise. Further research is needed that corrects on prior study design flaws and has a sufficient sample size, to definitively answer the question of Tai Chi efficacy. This meta-analysis suggests Tai Chi is a beneficial form of exercise, and provides information for sample size calculations. Table 1: Tai Chi Aerobic Capacity Effects Sizes and 95% Confidence Intervals Selected Group for Analysis ESLBCIUBCI Cross-sectional design 1861.01*+0.37+1.66 Experimental design 1580.33-0.41+1.07 Classical Yang style of Tai Chi 2241.10*+0.82+1.38 Sedentary comparisons 2530.80*+0.19+1.4152-week intervention 580.94*+0.06+1.81n = sample size, ES = effect size, LBCI = lower bound confidence interval, UBCI = upper bound confidence interval. n = sample size, ES = effect size, LBCI = lower bound confidence interval, UBCI = upper bound confidence interval. This research project was supported by a pre-doctoral training grant # 1 F31 NR08180-01 awarded to Ruth E. Taylor-Piliae from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:31:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:31:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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