An Exploratory Analysis: Environmental Modifications on the Sleep-Wake State in Preterm Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158119
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exploratory Analysis: Environmental Modifications on the Sleep-Wake State in Preterm Infants
Abstract:
An Exploratory Analysis: Environmental Modifications on the Sleep-Wake State in Preterm Infants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Tsai, Shao-Yu, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:Box 357260, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Co-Authors:Thomas, K A
Preterm infants have unique physiological and behavioral characteristics that may affect the positive sleep-wake state development; however, little is known regarding to what extent preterm infant sleep-wake states change with caregiving and without caregiving under environmental modifications. The purpose of this study was to examine the sleep-wake state, caregiving events, and environmental modifications in preterm infants around 34 weeks postconceptional age (PCA) and to explore the relationship among them. The specific aims were to investigate the possible effect of environmental modifications on the sleep-wake state in preterm infants and to evaluate whether and how demographic variables as well as caregiving events affect the sleep-wake state of preterm infants. Forty-two preterm infants between 27 and 35 weeks gestation were randomized to either the experimental or control group. The experimental nursery was a specially designed NICU with day-night cycled lighting and reduced light/sound. The control nursery was a regular NICU environment. Infants were videotaped around 34 weeks PCA. Infant sleep-wake state and patterns of caregiving were then coded in every 15 seconds. Findings suggested that gender had statistically significant effect on the sleep-wake state in preterm infants around 34 weeks PCA. No significant differences were noted in infants across nurseries regarding the number of state changes with care and state changes without care. Infants with greater amounts of state change without care were associated with more state change with care although the relationship did not achieve the significance level of 0.05 (p=0.053). In conclusion, our results supported that infants showed significant individual differences in organizing their states around 34 weeks PCA, and males tended to spend more time in wakefulness than females. Further studies are needed to take gender into account when investigating what types of caregiving and environment should be implemented to incorporate state modulation concepts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exploratory Analysis: Environmental Modifications on the Sleep-Wake State in Preterm Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158119-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Exploratory Analysis: Environmental Modifications on the Sleep-Wake State in Preterm Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Shao-Yu, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 357260, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Thomas, K A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Preterm infants have unique physiological and behavioral characteristics that may affect the positive sleep-wake state development; however, little is known regarding to what extent preterm infant sleep-wake states change with caregiving and without caregiving under environmental modifications. The purpose of this study was to examine the sleep-wake state, caregiving events, and environmental modifications in preterm infants around 34 weeks postconceptional age (PCA) and to explore the relationship among them. The specific aims were to investigate the possible effect of environmental modifications on the sleep-wake state in preterm infants and to evaluate whether and how demographic variables as well as caregiving events affect the sleep-wake state of preterm infants. Forty-two preterm infants between 27 and 35 weeks gestation were randomized to either the experimental or control group. The experimental nursery was a specially designed NICU with day-night cycled lighting and reduced light/sound. The control nursery was a regular NICU environment. Infants were videotaped around 34 weeks PCA. Infant sleep-wake state and patterns of caregiving were then coded in every 15 seconds. Findings suggested that gender had statistically significant effect on the sleep-wake state in preterm infants around 34 weeks PCA. No significant differences were noted in infants across nurseries regarding the number of state changes with care and state changes without care. Infants with greater amounts of state change without care were associated with more state change with care although the relationship did not achieve the significance level of 0.05 (p=0.053). In conclusion, our results supported that infants showed significant individual differences in organizing their states around 34 weeks PCA, and males tended to spend more time in wakefulness than females. Further studies are needed to take gender into account when investigating what types of caregiving and environment should be implemented to incorporate state modulation concepts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:31:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:31:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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