2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158123
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Perceptions of Caring and Support After Miscarriage
Abstract:
Gender Differences in Perceptions of Caring and Support After Miscarriage
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Wojnar, Danuta, RN, MN, Med
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:University of Washington, Dept. of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA
Co-Authors:Kristen Swanson, RN, PhD, FAAN; Anthippy Petras, MSW
Purpose: 1) To describe the differences in male and female perceptions of their partner’s caring and support, as well as, support received from others after miscarriage. 2) To explore associations between quality of couples’ relationships prior to miscarriage and perceptions of partners’ caring and support, as well as support received from others after loss. Rationale: Women whose partners perform caring acts and engage in mutual sharing perceive their couple relationships as stronger or unchanged at 1 year after loss[1]. Yet, little is known about the quality of couples’ relationships prior to miscarriage and its association with perceptions of caring and support received after pregnancy loss. Methods: A sample of 112 couples less than 12 weeks post miscarriage was available for analysis. Paired t-tests were used to identify differences in relationship history, perceptions of partner caring, and satisfaction with support received from partner and others. Pearson’s Product Moment correlations were used to explore associations between quality of couples’ relationships prior to loss, Culturally, one of life’s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of “a good death” is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients’ homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals frAB: Culturally, one of life’s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of “a good death” is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients’ homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals from local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses’ attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses’ attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (?2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention. Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care. om local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses’ attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses’ attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (c2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention.[1] Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care. and caring and support received after miscarriage. Measures included Swanson’s Quality of Relationship History and subscales from her Caring Other Scale (caring by doing and mutual sharing) and Brown’s Satisfaction with Partner’s and Other’s Support Scales. Findings: There were no significant differences in the ways males and females rated the quality of their couple relationship prior to miscarriage. Subsequent to miscarriage, women were more likely to claim that their mates demonstrated (t=3.7; p<.001) ‘caring by doing’ [(females M=23.58; SD= 4.92) (males M=21.69; SD= 5.13)]. There were no differences in men and women’s perceptions of their mate’s mutual sharing or satisfaction with their partner’s support. Women were, however, more satisfied (t=4.53; p<.001) than their mates with the support they received from others [(females M=50.33; SD=10.23) (males M= 44.41; SD= 10.35)]. There was no association between men’s and women’s satisfaction with support from others. Quality of couple relationship prior to miscarriage was positively associated (p<.001) with women’s (r=.68) and men’s (r= .63) satisfaction with support from their mate; women’s (r=.60) and men’s (r=.49) rating of their partner’s demonstrating their caring by doing; and women’s rating of their partner’s caring by mutual sharing (r=.51). There were no significant associations between pre loss quality of couples relationships and post loss satisfaction with support from others. Implications: After miscarriage, men were more likely than women to demonstrate caring for their mate by ‘doing-for’ acts. Males and females are equally satisfied with the emotional support they receive from each other and rate each other similarly on demonstration of caring by mutual sharing. Relationship quality prior to loss is predictive of satisfaction with support from mates after loss. Females are more satisfied with support received from people in general than males, suggesting a potential societal lack of appreciation for the toll miscarriage takes on men.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Perceptions of Caring and Support After Miscarriageen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158123-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in Perceptions of Caring and Support After Miscarriage </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wojnar, Danuta, RN, MN, Med</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Dept. of Family and Child Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kristen Swanson, RN, PhD, FAAN; Anthippy Petras, MSW</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: 1) To describe the differences in male and female perceptions of their partner&rsquo;s caring and support, as well as, support received from others after miscarriage. 2) To explore associations between quality of couples&rsquo; relationships prior to miscarriage and perceptions of partners&rsquo; caring and support, as well as support received from others after loss. Rationale: Women whose partners perform caring acts and engage in mutual sharing perceive their couple relationships as stronger or unchanged at 1 year after loss[1]. Yet, little is known about the quality of couples&rsquo; relationships prior to miscarriage and its association with perceptions of caring and support received after pregnancy loss. Methods: A sample of 112 couples less than 12 weeks post miscarriage was available for analysis. Paired t-tests were used to identify differences in relationship history, perceptions of partner caring, and satisfaction with support received from partner and others. Pearson&rsquo;s Product Moment correlations were used to explore associations between quality of couples&rsquo; relationships prior to loss, Culturally, one of life&rsquo;s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of &ldquo;a good death&rdquo; is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients&rsquo; homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals frAB: Culturally, one of life&rsquo;s important goals among Taiwanese is to pursue a good death. Research findings suggest that one criteria of &ldquo;a good death&rdquo; is to pass away at home (Chiu, 1995; Hu, 1999). To meet the increased needs of palliative care at patients&rsquo; homes, the Department of Health in Taiwan proposed to establish a home palliative care system in rural areas delivered by health professionals from local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (?2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention. Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care. om local governmental health stations. To assess the feasibility of this proposal, a study was conducted to examine public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes of providing palliative care in rural communities. Purpose: This study was to develop a scale to measure public health nurses&rsquo; attitudes toward providing palliative care in communities and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: Scales were developed based on qualitative data from and in-depth open-ended interviews with ten health care providers. Scale items were modified following review by an expert panel and pilot testing with 35 health care providers. A large, national cross-sectional survey was subsequently conducted in 2000. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,121 district nurses at 174 governmental health stations covering all rural communities in Taiwan. Non-respondents were contacted and reminded two months later. A total of 940 (83.9%) respondents with a mean age of 38 years from 162 (93.1%) governmental health stations participated. Descriptive statistics, reliability, and confirmatory factor analysis were used to assess the sample characteristics and to establish the psychometric properties of the scale, including construct validity. Results: The final attitude scale included 3 key constructs: (1) perceived threats when caring for dying patients (8 items); (2) perceived benefits of providing palliative care (12 items); (3) perceived barriers providing palliative care (6 items). The internal consistency reliability for each subscale was .65, .93 and .88 respectively, and .88 for the total scale. Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested good model fits of each subscale as well as the total scale (c2(296)=2081.9; CFI= .95; RMSEA= .08). Conclusions: The study results demonstrated strong psychometric properties for this scale. Future research will test this scale with physicians working in the rural communities and will to compare the results with public heath nurses. These results reflect systematic approach to design a multidisciplinary community-based intervention.[1] Importantly, these findings will contribute to design more effective and practical training sessions for health care providers for the purpose of providing palliative care. and caring and support received after miscarriage. Measures included Swanson&rsquo;s Quality of Relationship History and subscales from her Caring Other Scale (caring by doing and mutual sharing) and Brown&rsquo;s Satisfaction with Partner&rsquo;s and Other&rsquo;s Support Scales. Findings: There were no significant differences in the ways males and females rated the quality of their couple relationship prior to miscarriage. Subsequent to miscarriage, women were more likely to claim that their mates demonstrated (t=3.7; p&lt;.001) &lsquo;caring by doing&rsquo; [(females M=23.58; SD= 4.92) (males M=21.69; SD= 5.13)]. There were no differences in men and women&rsquo;s perceptions of their mate&rsquo;s mutual sharing or satisfaction with their partner&rsquo;s support. Women were, however, more satisfied (t=4.53; p&lt;.001) than their mates with the support they received from others [(females M=50.33; SD=10.23) (males M= 44.41; SD= 10.35)]. There was no association between men&rsquo;s and women&rsquo;s satisfaction with support from others. Quality of couple relationship prior to miscarriage was positively associated (p&lt;.001) with women&rsquo;s (r=.68) and men&rsquo;s (r= .63) satisfaction with support from their mate; women&rsquo;s (r=.60) and men&rsquo;s (r=.49) rating of their partner&rsquo;s demonstrating their caring by doing; and women&rsquo;s rating of their partner&rsquo;s caring by mutual sharing (r=.51). There were no significant associations between pre loss quality of couples relationships and post loss satisfaction with support from others. Implications: After miscarriage, men were more likely than women to demonstrate caring for their mate by &lsquo;doing-for&rsquo; acts. Males and females are equally satisfied with the emotional support they receive from each other and rate each other similarly on demonstration of caring by mutual sharing. Relationship quality prior to loss is predictive of satisfaction with support from mates after loss. Females are more satisfied with support received from people in general than males, suggesting a potential societal lack of appreciation for the toll miscarriage takes on men. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:31:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:31:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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