2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158124
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cortisol Levels across the Menopausal Transition
Abstract:
Cortisol Levels across the Menopausal Transition
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Woods, Nancy, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Univesity of Washington School of Nursing
Contact Address:, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA
Co-Authors:Ellen Sullivan Mitchell, RN, PhD
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether cortisol levels change during the menopausal transition and whether the changes are associated with changes in the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis hormones (FSH and estrone). Background: Cortisol levels have been shown to rise with age, but have not been linked to the menopausal transition in prior studies. During the menopausal transition, there is evidence of adrenal androgen activation (transient elevation of DHEAS), and there are also changes in cardiovascular risk profiles, decreases in bone density, and minor cognitive complaints. Methods: Participants in the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (N=205) provided daily menstrual calendars beginning in 1990. A subset provided monthly first voided urine specimens analyzed for FSH and cortisol. A subset of women who had completed a transition from the early to middle menopausal transition stage (n=18), middle to late menopausal transition stage (n=22), or from the late stage to postmenopause (n=16) with complete assay data, and who were not using hormone therapy or corticosteroids, was selected for analyses. Results: Mean cortisol levels rose significantly during the 6 to 12 months after the onset of the late menopausal transition stage compared with levels 12 months to 6 months prior to the late transition stage. Increases in cortisol of over 10 ng/mg were seen in 56% of participants and 30% had a drop in cortisol of over 10 ng/mg. There were no significant differences during the 6 to 12 months before and after the middle transition stage or the final menstrual period (postmenopause). Women who had increases in cortisol were compared to those who had decreases with respect to age, BMI, FSH and estrone. Women who experienced the cortisol rise had significantly higher estrone levels, but did not differ from women with decreases in cortisol levels with respect to epinephrine, testosterone, FSH, BMI or age. Implications: Cortisol levels rose as women entered the late menopausal transition stage, but did not change as they made transitions to other stages. Women who had increased cortisol levels during the late menopausal transition stage also had higher levels of estrone, but did not differ from women with decreasing cortisol levels with respect to FSH, BMI or age. Since cortisol is usually tightly regulated, these increases with the late menopausal transition stage bear further investigation for their possible relationship to cognitive function, stress, symptoms, metabolic changes linked to cardiovascular disease, and bone density. These changes need to be investigated in a larger population-based sample of women. Funding Source: NINR R01-NR04141
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCortisol Levels across the Menopausal Transitionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158124-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cortisol Levels across the Menopausal Transition</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woods, Nancy, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Univesity of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Seattle, WA, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ellen Sullivan Mitchell, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether cortisol levels change during the menopausal transition and whether the changes are associated with changes in the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis hormones (FSH and estrone). Background: Cortisol levels have been shown to rise with age, but have not been linked to the menopausal transition in prior studies. During the menopausal transition, there is evidence of adrenal androgen activation (transient elevation of DHEAS), and there are also changes in cardiovascular risk profiles, decreases in bone density, and minor cognitive complaints. Methods: Participants in the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study (N=205) provided daily menstrual calendars beginning in 1990. A subset provided monthly first voided urine specimens analyzed for FSH and cortisol. A subset of women who had completed a transition from the early to middle menopausal transition stage (n=18), middle to late menopausal transition stage (n=22), or from the late stage to postmenopause (n=16) with complete assay data, and who were not using hormone therapy or corticosteroids, was selected for analyses. Results: Mean cortisol levels rose significantly during the 6 to 12 months after the onset of the late menopausal transition stage compared with levels 12 months to 6 months prior to the late transition stage. Increases in cortisol of over 10 ng/mg were seen in 56% of participants and 30% had a drop in cortisol of over 10 ng/mg. There were no significant differences during the 6 to 12 months before and after the middle transition stage or the final menstrual period (postmenopause). Women who had increases in cortisol were compared to those who had decreases with respect to age, BMI, FSH and estrone. Women who experienced the cortisol rise had significantly higher estrone levels, but did not differ from women with decreases in cortisol levels with respect to epinephrine, testosterone, FSH, BMI or age. Implications: Cortisol levels rose as women entered the late menopausal transition stage, but did not change as they made transitions to other stages. Women who had increased cortisol levels during the late menopausal transition stage also had higher levels of estrone, but did not differ from women with decreasing cortisol levels with respect to FSH, BMI or age. Since cortisol is usually tightly regulated, these increases with the late menopausal transition stage bear further investigation for their possible relationship to cognitive function, stress, symptoms, metabolic changes linked to cardiovascular disease, and bone density. These changes need to be investigated in a larger population-based sample of women. Funding Source: NINR R01-NR04141 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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