2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158126
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Irregularities in Elderly Patients
Abstract:
Medication Irregularities in Elderly Patients
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Zulkowski, Karen, DNS, RN, CWS
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University - Billings Campus
Contact Address:, Billings, MT, USA
Problems with medication errors have been of growing concern to the medical community since the 1970's. Medication non-adherence or inappropriate medication usage can endanger an individual's health, and increase financial burdens on the healthcare system. However, it is estimated that 29-59% of patients make errors while administering their own medications and that 4-35% of ambulatory patients use medications in a way that pose actual or potential risk to their health. Persons >65 year of age comprise 18% of the population, but receive nearly half of all prescribed medications. Older adults are felt to be at especially high risk for medication non-adherence. This may be in part because older adults have significantly more chronic conditions than their younger counterparts resulting in an increased need for prescription medications. This increased need for medication places a financial burden on the elderly person and may necessitate the person having to choose between buying food or buying their medication. In addition to an increasing number and/or exacerbation of chronic illness, elderly persons often experience a progressive decline in their psychosocial, functional and cognitive status. These additional factors may limit the elderly person’s ability to follow an often complex or changing medication regime. This is often most apparent at transitions in care such as at hospital admission, discharge and the immediate post hospitalization period.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Irregularities in Elderly Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158126-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Irregularities in Elderly Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zulkowski, Karen, DNS, RN, CWS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University - Billings Campus</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Billings, MT, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> Problems with medication errors have been of growing concern to the medical community since the 1970's. Medication non-adherence or inappropriate medication usage can endanger an individual's health, and increase financial burdens on the healthcare system. However, it is estimated that 29-59% of patients make errors while administering their own medications and that 4-35% of ambulatory patients use medications in a way that pose actual or potential risk to their health. Persons &gt;65 year of age comprise 18% of the population, but receive nearly half of all prescribed medications. Older adults are felt to be at especially high risk for medication non-adherence. This may be in part because older adults have significantly more chronic conditions than their younger counterparts resulting in an increased need for prescription medications. This increased need for medication places a financial burden on the elderly person and may necessitate the person having to choose between buying food or buying their medication. In addition to an increasing number and/or exacerbation of chronic illness, elderly persons often experience a progressive decline in their psychosocial, functional and cognitive status. These additional factors may limit the elderly person&rsquo;s ability to follow an often complex or changing medication regime. This is often most apparent at transitions in care such as at hospital admission, discharge and the immediate post hospitalization period.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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