2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158128
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Overview
Abstract:
Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Overview
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Anderson, Nancy, RNC, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California, Los Angeles School of Nursing
Title:Professor Emeritus
Contact Address:Los Angeles School of Nursing, Box 956919, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA
Contact Telephone:310-206-8358
Purpose/Aims: This symposium highlights the inherent strengths possessed by those individuals, families, and communities who have been identified as vulnerable for suffering health disparities. Vulnerable populations, often characterized for research purposes by their problems, deficits and needs, also possess amazing resilience and strength in the face of diversity, strengths that can serve as valuable resources to be tapped in time of stress. This symposium showcases the strengths discovered in four studies, each with a different vulnerable population. Background: People of color, people of low income, those who suffer from serious health risks and/or morbidity, discrimination, stigmatization, and marginalization most often fall into the vulnerable category. This symposium explores the concept of individual and community strengths as resources. Overview of the Studies: Nyamathi, using a Vulnerable Populations framework, discovered personal resources and strengths among women of color at risk for daily drug use. Koniak-Griffin explored the development of psychological strengths among teen mothers during an HIV prevention program based on concepts from Social Cognitive Theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action. Ethnographic and participatory research theoretical approaches led Anderson to the discovery of courage and resourcefulness among adolescents in juvenile detention. Heilemann, Lee and Kury examined intrinsic strength factors related to mastery, resilience, life satisfaction and vitality in relation to acculturation among women of Mexican descent. Implications: Findings from these studies offer an innovative opportunity for nurse scientists to enhance their approaches to research, practice, and education. The identification of strengths is not a new strategy, but it is one that is easily forgotten or neglected in the pressure to address health disparities among vulnerable populations with evidence based practice and research focused on population deficits. We suggest that the inner strength and resilience each of these populations possess offer a new perspective on the resources concept. Funding support from NIH/NINR P30005041
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Overviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158128-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strengths and Resources in Vulnerable Populations: Overview</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Nancy, RNC, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California, Los Angeles School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor Emeritus</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Los Angeles School of Nursing, Box 956919, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-6919, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">310-206-8358</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nanderso@sonnet.ucla.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: This symposium highlights the inherent strengths possessed by those individuals, families, and communities who have been identified as vulnerable for suffering health disparities. Vulnerable populations, often characterized for research purposes by their problems, deficits and needs, also possess amazing resilience and strength in the face of diversity, strengths that can serve as valuable resources to be tapped in time of stress. This symposium showcases the strengths discovered in four studies, each with a different vulnerable population. Background: People of color, people of low income, those who suffer from serious health risks and/or morbidity, discrimination, stigmatization, and marginalization most often fall into the vulnerable category. This symposium explores the concept of individual and community strengths as resources. Overview of the Studies: Nyamathi, using a Vulnerable Populations framework, discovered personal resources and strengths among women of color at risk for daily drug use. Koniak-Griffin explored the development of psychological strengths among teen mothers during an HIV prevention program based on concepts from Social Cognitive Theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action. Ethnographic and participatory research theoretical approaches led Anderson to the discovery of courage and resourcefulness among adolescents in juvenile detention. Heilemann, Lee and Kury examined intrinsic strength factors related to mastery, resilience, life satisfaction and vitality in relation to acculturation among women of Mexican descent. Implications: Findings from these studies offer an innovative opportunity for nurse scientists to enhance their approaches to research, practice, and education. The identification of strengths is not a new strategy, but it is one that is easily forgotten or neglected in the pressure to address health disparities among vulnerable populations with evidence based practice and research focused on population deficits. We suggest that the inner strength and resilience each of these populations possess offer a new perspective on the resources concept. Funding support from NIH/NINR P30005041</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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