2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158129
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of Depressed and Non-Depressed ALF Residents
Abstract:
Characteristics of Depressed and Non-Depressed ALF Residents
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Ballantyne, Jean, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 574, 1500 University Drive, Billings, MT, 59101, USA
Contact Telephone:406-657-1730
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare demographic, health-related and environmental characteristics for depressed and non-depressed residents age 65 and older in assisted living facilities (ALFs). Background: Assisted living residents are an increasingly large and vulnerable population at risk for health and functional decline. As a community resource for elders who can no longer live independently, ALFs offer a home-like setting while providing oversight and assistance with personal care needs. Assisted living facilities are neither licensed nor regulated as health care facilities. Yet, residents typically have several chronic illnesses and a high degree of frailty. Although depression is known to be one of the most common and debilitating conditions in older adults, little is known about depression in this population. Untreated late-life depression is a serious, pernicious illness associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, particularly from suicide. Furthermore, depressed ALF residents are at increased risk for a decline in health and discharge to another setting for a higher level of care. Methods: A cross-sectional exploratory design was utilized as part of a larger secondary analysis of an existing dataset in Oregon. Of the total sample (N = 277), 34.4 % were depressed by study criteria of a score of 5 or higher on the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form. T-tests were used in the inferential analysis with an alpha level of .05. Results: Males comprised a significantly higher proportion of the depressed group (26.3 VS 15.4%). However, both groups were demographically similar in terms of age and education. Healthwise, depressed participants took significantly more medications (M = 12.18, SD 4.89) than non-depressed participants (M = 10.64, SD 5.09) and reported significantly less functional ability as measured with the Physical Self Maintenance Scale (range = 8 to 24; Depressed: M = 19.63, SD 3.04; Non-depressed: M = 21.15, SD 2.58). Cognitive impairment was moderate among participants and not significantly different between the groups. Depressed and non-depressed participants had similar numbers of chronic illnesses, (4.86, SD 2.37) and (4.43, SD 2.17) respectively. There were no significant environmental differences between the two groups. About one third of each group lived in rural ALFs and one third of participants were on Medicaid. Implications: The high prevalence of depression and level of frailty among study participants coupled with the non-medical ALF setting poses unique challenges to improving depression care for this population. From these results, there is an indication for more professional nursing oversight than is generally available in this setting. Of serious concern, but particularly alarming for those with depression is the high number of medications. Health policies are warranted which support a preventive approach. Based on these findings, depression screening should target ALF residents with characteristics of male gender, functional impairment, and high numbers of medications. Given ALF residents have a high number of chronic illnesses which are typically treated pharmacologically, further research is needed to explore the linkage between high medication use and depression. Acknowledgment: Dataset from State of Oregon, Senior and People with Disabilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of Depressed and Non-Depressed ALF Residentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158129-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics of Depressed and Non-Depressed ALF Residents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ballantyne, Jean, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University - Bozeman College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 574, 1500 University Drive, Billings, MT, 59101, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406-657-1730</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeanb@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare demographic, health-related and environmental characteristics for depressed and non-depressed residents age 65 and older in assisted living facilities (ALFs). Background: Assisted living residents are an increasingly large and vulnerable population at risk for health and functional decline. As a community resource for elders who can no longer live independently, ALFs offer a home-like setting while providing oversight and assistance with personal care needs. Assisted living facilities are neither licensed nor regulated as health care facilities. Yet, residents typically have several chronic illnesses and a high degree of frailty. Although depression is known to be one of the most common and debilitating conditions in older adults, little is known about depression in this population. Untreated late-life depression is a serious, pernicious illness associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, particularly from suicide. Furthermore, depressed ALF residents are at increased risk for a decline in health and discharge to another setting for a higher level of care. Methods: A cross-sectional exploratory design was utilized as part of a larger secondary analysis of an existing dataset in Oregon. Of the total sample (N = 277), 34.4 % were depressed by study criteria of a score of 5 or higher on the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form. T-tests were used in the inferential analysis with an alpha level of .05. Results: Males comprised a significantly higher proportion of the depressed group (26.3 VS 15.4%). However, both groups were demographically similar in terms of age and education. Healthwise, depressed participants took significantly more medications (M = 12.18, SD 4.89) than non-depressed participants (M = 10.64, SD 5.09) and reported significantly less functional ability as measured with the Physical Self Maintenance Scale (range = 8 to 24; Depressed: M = 19.63, SD 3.04; Non-depressed: M = 21.15, SD 2.58). Cognitive impairment was moderate among participants and not significantly different between the groups. Depressed and non-depressed participants had similar numbers of chronic illnesses, (4.86, SD 2.37) and (4.43, SD 2.17) respectively. There were no significant environmental differences between the two groups. About one third of each group lived in rural ALFs and one third of participants were on Medicaid. Implications: The high prevalence of depression and level of frailty among study participants coupled with the non-medical ALF setting poses unique challenges to improving depression care for this population. From these results, there is an indication for more professional nursing oversight than is generally available in this setting. Of serious concern, but particularly alarming for those with depression is the high number of medications. Health policies are warranted which support a preventive approach. Based on these findings, depression screening should target ALF residents with characteristics of male gender, functional impairment, and high numbers of medications. Given ALF residents have a high number of chronic illnesses which are typically treated pharmacologically, further research is needed to explore the linkage between high medication use and depression. Acknowledgment: Dataset from State of Oregon, Senior and People with Disabilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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