2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158130
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Coaching on Adherence to Exercise After Pulmonary Rehabilitation
Abstract:
Effects of Coaching on Adherence to Exercise After Pulmonary Rehabilitation
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Belza, Basia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Department of Biobehavioral Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98115, USA
Contact Telephone:206-685-2266
Co-Authors:Bonnie Steele, Kevin Cain, Jeff Coppersmith, JoEllen Howard, Sambasiva Lakshminarayan
Background: Pulmonary disease impairs performance and produces losses of functioning and life quality. Although pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves functioning and life quality, the benefits are frequently diminished due to poor adherence to exercise. Purpose: To determine if a post-PR program home visit, written materials, and weekly phone calls offering individually-tailored coaching is more effective than usual care in maintaining an activity and exercise program. Methods: 75 outpatients (73 men; mean age 64 years; mean forced expiratory volume in one second-40% predicted) completed an 8-week PR program and were randomized to an intervention or control group. Data were collected during the final week of PR and after completion of the intervention three months later. Measures: daily activity (vector magnitude units/min [VMU/min], RT-3 accelerometer), exercise adherence (minutes/day, Daily Activity Diary), exercise capacity (feet, Six-Minute Walk test), walking self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Walking Scale), dyspnea (Lareau Functional Status and Dyspnea Questionnaire), fatigue (Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue scale), health status (SF-36V) and life quality (Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire). Findings: Change scores from completion of PR to 3 months were analyzed using nonparametric statistics (Mann-Whitney U) due to the non-normal distributions of the variables (significance set at p<.05). Daily activity increased by 17 VMU/min. in the intervention group compared to a decline of 6 VMU/min. in controls (p<.017); exercise adherence increased from 30 to 37 min/day in the intervention group and declined from 26 to 15 min/day in controls (p=.015). There were no differences between intervention and control groups in exercise capacity, walking self-efficacy, dyspnea, fatigue, health status, and life quality. Conclusions: A coaching intervention maintained daily activity and exercise improvement in this sedentary population. This intervention can be implemented in VA outpatient settings to improve adherence to and functional benefit from prescribed exercise in high-risk populations. Funded by VA Health Services Research and Development Merit Review NRI 98-194.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Coaching on Adherence to Exercise After Pulmonary Rehabilitationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158130-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Coaching on Adherence to Exercise After Pulmonary Rehabilitation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belza, Basia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Department of Biobehavioral Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Box 357266, Seattle, WA, 98115, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-685-2266</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">basiab@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Steele, Kevin Cain, Jeff Coppersmith, JoEllen Howard, Sambasiva Lakshminarayan</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Pulmonary disease impairs performance and produces losses of functioning and life quality. Although pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) improves functioning and life quality, the benefits are frequently diminished due to poor adherence to exercise. Purpose: To determine if a post-PR program home visit, written materials, and weekly phone calls offering individually-tailored coaching is more effective than usual care in maintaining an activity and exercise program. Methods: 75 outpatients (73 men; mean age 64 years; mean forced expiratory volume in one second-40% predicted) completed an 8-week PR program and were randomized to an intervention or control group. Data were collected during the final week of PR and after completion of the intervention three months later. Measures: daily activity (vector magnitude units/min [VMU/min], RT-3 accelerometer), exercise adherence (minutes/day, Daily Activity Diary), exercise capacity (feet, Six-Minute Walk test), walking self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy for Walking Scale), dyspnea (Lareau Functional Status and Dyspnea Questionnaire), fatigue (Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue scale), health status (SF-36V) and life quality (Seattle Obstructive Lung Disease Questionnaire). Findings: Change scores from completion of PR to 3 months were analyzed using nonparametric statistics (Mann-Whitney U) due to the non-normal distributions of the variables (significance set at p&lt;.05). Daily activity increased by 17 VMU/min. in the intervention group compared to a decline of 6 VMU/min. in controls (p&lt;.017); exercise adherence increased from 30 to 37 min/day in the intervention group and declined from 26 to 15 min/day in controls (p=.015). There were no differences between intervention and control groups in exercise capacity, walking self-efficacy, dyspnea, fatigue, health status, and life quality. Conclusions: A coaching intervention maintained daily activity and exercise improvement in this sedentary population. This intervention can be implemented in VA outpatient settings to improve adherence to and functional benefit from prescribed exercise in high-risk populations. Funded by VA Health Services Research and Development Merit Review NRI 98-194.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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