2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158131
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Menopause Symptom Management In Breast Cancer Survivors
Abstract:
Menopause Symptom Management In Breast Cancer Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Berg, Judith, PhD, RNC, WHNP, FAANP
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Arizona
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:37565 S. Stoney Cliff Ct, Tucson, AZ, 85739-1413, USA
Contact Telephone:520-626-2206
Co-Authors:Alice Pasvogel
Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a multimodal treatment package (MMTP) (high-fiber, low-fat diet; moderate aerobic exercise; stress reducing breathing techniques) on symptoms encountered during the menopause transition (MS) of breast cancer survivors. The MMTP was based on the work of Taylor at UCSF who developed the treatment for women experiencing severe PMS. It was modified for menopause use by Berg. Rationale/Conceptual bases/Background: Breast cancer survivors experience menopause symptoms as a result of their breast cancer treatment, adjuvant therapy, sudden cessation of hormone therapy (HT), or as part of their natural transition to post-reproductive phase. Their cancer history, however, precludes the use of hormones or other treatment (e.g., phytoestrogenic herbs and substances) modalities that may affect estrogen positive tumors. As well, many of these women avoid such treatments as they fear recurrence. Alternative treatments, such as positive behavior changes, are known to reduce severe vasomotor symptoms but are untested for others, such as emotional, somatic, discomfort or insomnia. The current study utilized the Menopause Symptom Management Model based on the work of Taylor and Lee and Colleagues in which personal characteristics affect the menopausal experience either directly or through the mediator of well being, while self-monitoring and self-modification are the mechanisms by which the MMTP affects the outcome of symptom experience. Methods: A longitudinal randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effects of the MMTP on emotional (panic, nervous, mood swings, depression, irritability, difficulty concentrating, tearfulness, forgetfulness, fatigue or tiredness), vasomotor (cold sweats, hot flashes), somatic (dizziness, nausea, loss of appetite, headache), discomfort (breast tenderness, feeling of weight gain, joint pain/stiffness, back or neck ache), and insomnia symptoms (difficulty falling asleep, waking during night, waking up too early). Women were randomized to either immediate or delayed treatment groups. To profile the MS experience, women completed daily symptom diaries comprised of the Menstrual Symptom Severity List created by Woods and colleagues. Demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and measures of central tendency while the effect of the MMTP on MS was calculated using ANOVA procedures with 28 days of daily diaries aggregated by subscale at baseline (BL), one month post treatment initiation (PT1), and three months post treatment initiation (PT3). Results: Breast cancer survivors were screened for symptom severity (12/36 on screening questionnaire developed for the study). A total of 8 women completed all measures (treatment group [TG], n=5; delayed treatment group [DTG], n=3). Since women were not significantly different at BL on any of the measures, their data were combined for this analysis. All subscale scores were significantly lower at PT3, with the exception of somatic symptoms which remained the same. Symptom reductions were: emotional (16.6%; 16.3¦4.7 - 13.5¦4.6), vasomotor (23.3%; 4.3¦1.6.7 - 3.3¦1.5), discomfort (17.1%; 7.0¦2.2 - 5.8¦1.9), and insomnia (11%; 6.8¦3.5 - 6.1¦3.3). Somatic symptoms did not change from BL to PT3 (5.0¦1.0 - 5.0¦1.7) Implications: This study has implications for breast cancer survivors, for health care providers, and for nurses who educate women. The MMTP is comprised of health promotion behaviors that are known to reduce future morbidity and mortality. The treatment offers an option for breast cancer survivors with menopause symptoms and informs nurses and health care providers about alternatives to HT for this group that is increasing in number. Severe menopause symptoms have a negative impact on quality of life, and this study elucidates the effect of health promotion on severe symptoms and has potential to expand breast cancer survivors' options for treatment. As well, the use of health promotion behaviors for symptom management may provide motivation to utilize behaviors that positively effect health longer term. A larger sample studied for a longer time is needed to test this hypothesis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMenopause Symptom Management In Breast Cancer Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158131-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Menopause Symptom Management In Breast Cancer Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Berg, Judith, PhD, RNC, WHNP, FAANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">37565 S. Stoney Cliff Ct, Tucson, AZ, 85739-1413, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520-626-2206</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jberg@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Alice Pasvogel</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a multimodal treatment package (MMTP) (high-fiber, low-fat diet; moderate aerobic exercise; stress reducing breathing techniques) on symptoms encountered during the menopause transition (MS) of breast cancer survivors. The MMTP was based on the work of Taylor at UCSF who developed the treatment for women experiencing severe PMS. It was modified for menopause use by Berg. Rationale/Conceptual bases/Background: Breast cancer survivors experience menopause symptoms as a result of their breast cancer treatment, adjuvant therapy, sudden cessation of hormone therapy (HT), or as part of their natural transition to post-reproductive phase. Their cancer history, however, precludes the use of hormones or other treatment (e.g., phytoestrogenic herbs and substances) modalities that may affect estrogen positive tumors. As well, many of these women avoid such treatments as they fear recurrence. Alternative treatments, such as positive behavior changes, are known to reduce severe vasomotor symptoms but are untested for others, such as emotional, somatic, discomfort or insomnia. The current study utilized the Menopause Symptom Management Model based on the work of Taylor and Lee and Colleagues in which personal characteristics affect the menopausal experience either directly or through the mediator of well being, while self-monitoring and self-modification are the mechanisms by which the MMTP affects the outcome of symptom experience. Methods: A longitudinal randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effects of the MMTP on emotional (panic, nervous, mood swings, depression, irritability, difficulty concentrating, tearfulness, forgetfulness, fatigue or tiredness), vasomotor (cold sweats, hot flashes), somatic (dizziness, nausea, loss of appetite, headache), discomfort (breast tenderness, feeling of weight gain, joint pain/stiffness, back or neck ache), and insomnia symptoms (difficulty falling asleep, waking during night, waking up too early). Women were randomized to either immediate or delayed treatment groups. To profile the MS experience, women completed daily symptom diaries comprised of the Menstrual Symptom Severity List created by Woods and colleagues. Demographic data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and measures of central tendency while the effect of the MMTP on MS was calculated using ANOVA procedures with 28 days of daily diaries aggregated by subscale at baseline (BL), one month post treatment initiation (PT1), and three months post treatment initiation (PT3). Results: Breast cancer survivors were screened for symptom severity (12/36 on screening questionnaire developed for the study). A total of 8 women completed all measures (treatment group [TG], n=5; delayed treatment group [DTG], n=3). Since women were not significantly different at BL on any of the measures, their data were combined for this analysis. All subscale scores were significantly lower at PT3, with the exception of somatic symptoms which remained the same. Symptom reductions were: emotional (16.6%; 16.3&brvbar;4.7 - 13.5&brvbar;4.6), vasomotor (23.3%; 4.3&brvbar;1.6.7 - 3.3&brvbar;1.5), discomfort (17.1%; 7.0&brvbar;2.2 - 5.8&brvbar;1.9), and insomnia (11%; 6.8&brvbar;3.5 - 6.1&brvbar;3.3). Somatic symptoms did not change from BL to PT3 (5.0&brvbar;1.0 - 5.0&brvbar;1.7) Implications: This study has implications for breast cancer survivors, for health care providers, and for nurses who educate women. The MMTP is comprised of health promotion behaviors that are known to reduce future morbidity and mortality. The treatment offers an option for breast cancer survivors with menopause symptoms and informs nurses and health care providers about alternatives to HT for this group that is increasing in number. Severe menopause symptoms have a negative impact on quality of life, and this study elucidates the effect of health promotion on severe symptoms and has potential to expand breast cancer survivors' options for treatment. As well, the use of health promotion behaviors for symptom management may provide motivation to utilize behaviors that positively effect health longer term. A larger sample studied for a longer time is needed to test this hypothesis.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.