2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158134
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Diabetes Self-Care Behaviors and Self-Efficacy in a Biethnic Population
Abstract:
Diabetes Self-Care Behaviors and Self-Efficacy in a Biethnic Population
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Borges, Wanda, DSN
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 30001, MSC 3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA
Contact Telephone:505-646-2111
Background: Diabetes is the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S. and the prevalence of diabetes in Hispanics is reported to be two times greater than non-Hispanics. The unequal burden of diabetes significantly impacts communities along the U.S. - Mexico border where prevalence rates are 2-4 times higher for Hispanics than non-Hispanic whites. While health care providers prescribe the medical management, patients are responsible for the day-to-day self-care behaviors required to manage their disease. Hispanics perform diabetes self-care behaviors less frequently than other ethnic groups. Age and gender have also been shown to impact self-care behaviors. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the relationships among age, ethnicity, gender, self-efficacy, and self-reported self-care behaviors in patients with Type 2 diabetes who presented to the emergency department (ED) for non-emergent care in a southwest border community. Sample: A total of 167 adults, age > 40, with type 2 diabetes consented to participate in the study. The majority of participants were Mexican-American (74 %) and female (65%) with a mean age of 62 (SD = 11.4). Acculturation scores ranged from 1 to 5 with a mean score of 2.5 (SD = .93); 39% (n=66) of participants preferred to communicate in Spanish. Fifty-eight percent (n=97) of participants had not completed high school. While 77% (n = 128) of participants had some type of insurance, 35% (n = 58) of those insured qualified for state assisted Medicaid. Methods: The Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities (SDSCA), a 14-item questionnaire, which measures the frequency with which diabetes self-care behaviors were performed in the last week was administered by trained research assistants. In addition, diabetes self-efficacy was measured using a modified version of the Insulin Management Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale (MIMDSES), a 26-item scale. Results: Mexican-Americans reported performing foot self-care behaviors more frequently (t (165) = -2.08, p = .04) but monitoring blood glucose less often (t (162) = 1.92, p = .06) than non-Mexican Americans. Patients < 50 reported dietary self-care behaviors significantly less often than those > 50 (F (2, 164) = 7.89, p = <.01). Females performed foot self-care (t (165) = 2.38, p = .02) and blood glucose self monitoring (t (162) = 2.88, p = <.01) more often than males. Self-efficacy was significantly and positively correlated with all measured self-care behaviors. Conclusions: This predominantly Mexican-American population with Type 2 diabetes, who sought non-emergent care in an emergency department, had received little formal diabetes education and reported practicing diabetes self-care behaviors less than 5 days a week. Those with high self-efficacy scores, that is those who believed that they could control their behaviors, engaged in self-care behaviors more than those with lower scores. There is a clear need for culturally-based diabetes education that can increase self-efficacy and improve diabetes self-care behaviors. Funding: California HealthCare Foundation (99-5041A) and NIA, UCLA D. Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (AG 10415).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiabetes Self-Care Behaviors and Self-Efficacy in a Biethnic Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158134-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Diabetes Self-Care Behaviors and Self-Efficacy in a Biethnic Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Borges, Wanda, DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 30001, MSC 3185, Las Cruces, NM, 88003, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505-646-2111</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wjborges@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Diabetes is the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S. and the prevalence of diabetes in Hispanics is reported to be two times greater than non-Hispanics. The unequal burden of diabetes significantly impacts communities along the U.S. - Mexico border where prevalence rates are 2-4 times higher for Hispanics than non-Hispanic whites. While health care providers prescribe the medical management, patients are responsible for the day-to-day self-care behaviors required to manage their disease. Hispanics perform diabetes self-care behaviors less frequently than other ethnic groups. Age and gender have also been shown to impact self-care behaviors. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the relationships among age, ethnicity, gender, self-efficacy, and self-reported self-care behaviors in patients with Type 2 diabetes who presented to the emergency department (ED) for non-emergent care in a southwest border community. Sample: A total of 167 adults, age &gt; 40, with type 2 diabetes consented to participate in the study. The majority of participants were Mexican-American (74 %) and female (65%) with a mean age of 62 (SD = 11.4). Acculturation scores ranged from 1 to 5 with a mean score of 2.5 (SD = .93); 39% (n=66) of participants preferred to communicate in Spanish. Fifty-eight percent (n=97) of participants had not completed high school. While 77% (n = 128) of participants had some type of insurance, 35% (n = 58) of those insured qualified for state assisted Medicaid. Methods: The Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities (SDSCA), a 14-item questionnaire, which measures the frequency with which diabetes self-care behaviors were performed in the last week was administered by trained research assistants. In addition, diabetes self-efficacy was measured using a modified version of the Insulin Management Diabetes Self-Efficacy Scale (MIMDSES), a 26-item scale. Results: Mexican-Americans reported performing foot self-care behaviors more frequently (t (165) = -2.08, p = .04) but monitoring blood glucose less often (t (162) = 1.92, p = .06) than non-Mexican Americans. Patients &lt; 50 reported dietary self-care behaviors significantly less often than those &gt; 50 (F (2, 164) = 7.89, p = &lt;.01). Females performed foot self-care (t (165) = 2.38, p = .02) and blood glucose self monitoring (t (162) = 2.88, p = &lt;.01) more often than males. Self-efficacy was significantly and positively correlated with all measured self-care behaviors. Conclusions: This predominantly Mexican-American population with Type 2 diabetes, who sought non-emergent care in an emergency department, had received little formal diabetes education and reported practicing diabetes self-care behaviors less than 5 days a week. Those with high self-efficacy scores, that is those who believed that they could control their behaviors, engaged in self-care behaviors more than those with lower scores. There is a clear need for culturally-based diabetes education that can increase self-efficacy and improve diabetes self-care behaviors. Funding: California HealthCare Foundation (99-5041A) and NIA, UCLA D. Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (AG 10415).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.