2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158135
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Worry and Stress as Contexts for High Blood Pressure Disparity
Abstract:
Worry and Stress as Contexts for High Blood Pressure Disparity
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Boutain, Doris, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:900 Broadway, Seattle, WA, 98112, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-9769
Background: Studies exploring the role of stress in creating high blood pressure disparity among African Americans are on the rise. These approaches, though promising, often do not compare and contrast the different life experiences of African Americans across geographic locales. Inattention to how stress is conceptualized within population groups can lead to inappropriate interventions and generalizations. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to explore how African Americans in South Louisiana and Central Washington discussed how stress impacted their high blood pressure within their particular locales. Sample: A convenience sample (N=30) of African-American women (n=15) and men (n=15) with high blood pressure were study participants in South Louisiana. A purposive sample (N=37) of African-American women (n=15) and men (n=22) were study participants in Central Washington. Most participants were interviewed twice, using the same open-ended interview guide. Studies were conducted by the same researcher, one year apart from 1999-2000 and 2001-2002 respectively. Methods: Concepts from critical social theories, African-American Studies, and critical discourse analysis guided the qualitative discourse analysis study. Field experiences within the community and the assistance of community consultants were critical to data analysis in both locations. A seven stage data analysis protocol was created and used for both studies. Results: African Americans in rural Louisiana distinguished between worry and stress, noting that worry exacerbated the management of their high blood pressure. Worry was associated with concerns about self, children, kin and community health. Stress involved having multiple obligations and encountering multiple forms of discrimination. African Americans in urban Washington voiced that workplace and neighborhood stress impacted their high blood pressure management more often than worry or private concerns. Like participants in Louisiana, they too distinguished between stress and worry/concerns. Washington participants, however, noted that stress was more of a hindrance to the effective control of their blood pressure. Stress was most often discussed in terms of discriminatory encounters in the workplace and public. Implications: Worry and stress are important variables to study in relation to high blood pressure management among African Americans. Inattention to how participants contextually perceive worry and stress as affecting their high blood pressure can result in misdirected health care communications and interventions. Distinguishing between worry and stress can be a small, yet significant, nursing intervention to better facilitate holistic healthcare for African Americans. National Institute of Nursing Research (F31 NR07249-01); and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48/CCU009654-06). Appreciation is extended to Joseph Fletcher III.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorry and Stress as Contexts for High Blood Pressure Disparityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158135-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Worry and Stress as Contexts for High Blood Pressure Disparity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boutain, Doris, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">900 Broadway, Seattle, WA, 98112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-9769</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dboutain@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Studies exploring the role of stress in creating high blood pressure disparity among African Americans are on the rise. These approaches, though promising, often do not compare and contrast the different life experiences of African Americans across geographic locales. Inattention to how stress is conceptualized within population groups can lead to inappropriate interventions and generalizations. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to explore how African Americans in South Louisiana and Central Washington discussed how stress impacted their high blood pressure within their particular locales. Sample: A convenience sample (N=30) of African-American women (n=15) and men (n=15) with high blood pressure were study participants in South Louisiana. A purposive sample (N=37) of African-American women (n=15) and men (n=22) were study participants in Central Washington. Most participants were interviewed twice, using the same open-ended interview guide. Studies were conducted by the same researcher, one year apart from 1999-2000 and 2001-2002 respectively. Methods: Concepts from critical social theories, African-American Studies, and critical discourse analysis guided the qualitative discourse analysis study. Field experiences within the community and the assistance of community consultants were critical to data analysis in both locations. A seven stage data analysis protocol was created and used for both studies. Results: African Americans in rural Louisiana distinguished between worry and stress, noting that worry exacerbated the management of their high blood pressure. Worry was associated with concerns about self, children, kin and community health. Stress involved having multiple obligations and encountering multiple forms of discrimination. African Americans in urban Washington voiced that workplace and neighborhood stress impacted their high blood pressure management more often than worry or private concerns. Like participants in Louisiana, they too distinguished between stress and worry/concerns. Washington participants, however, noted that stress was more of a hindrance to the effective control of their blood pressure. Stress was most often discussed in terms of discriminatory encounters in the workplace and public. Implications: Worry and stress are important variables to study in relation to high blood pressure management among African Americans. Inattention to how participants contextually perceive worry and stress as affecting their high blood pressure can result in misdirected health care communications and interventions. Distinguishing between worry and stress can be a small, yet significant, nursing intervention to better facilitate holistic healthcare for African Americans. National Institute of Nursing Research (F31 NR07249-01); and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U48/CCU009654-06). Appreciation is extended to Joseph Fletcher III.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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