The Psychophysiology of Family Process and Health: Parenting Behaviors and Children's Physiological Stress

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158136
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Psychophysiology of Family Process and Health: Parenting Behaviors and Children's Physiological Stress
Abstract:
The Psychophysiology of Family Process and Health: Parenting Behaviors and Children's Physiological Stress
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bowie, Bonnie, RN, MSN, MBA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:Box 358736, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Contact Telephone:206-543-2969
Co-Authors:Chelsea Siler, L. Charmaine Barga, Cheryl Beardslee, Sybil CarrFre
Purpose: This research looks at the associations between children's reports about their emotions and their parents' help during emotionally stressful times with children's cardiovascular measures of stress during a dinnertime home visit. Rationale: Children's ability to regulate their emotional responses to stressful situations is associated with health outcomes. Parenting behaviors that helps children learn how to emotionally and physiologically soothe themselves during stressful times is also associated with health outcomes for children. This study assesses the role of parenting behaviors in children's emotional experience and physiological stress. Methods: Children in middle childhood (6-11 years old) were interviewed about their experience of anger and sadness and about their parents' role in helping them with those emotions. The children's ambulatory electrocardiogram measures were taken during a family dinnertime session in the home using Spacelabs Holter Monitors. Cardiovascular measures of general autonomic arousal (interbeat interval, IBI) and parasympathetic influence on the heart (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) were used to measure physiological stress in the children. Results: Children's self-reports of intensity and frequency of difficult emotions (anger and sadness) were not correlated with IBI or RSA for the children during the family dinner session in the home. The associations between the children's cardiovascular measures and the likelihood of going to either their mothers or fathers during emotionally stressful times were also not significant. However, the children who reported that their parents were understanding and comforting about their emotions of sadness and anger showed lower autonomic cardiovascular arousal during the family dinner session in the home (-226, indicating a longer time period between heart beats).Implications: When children perceive that their parents understand their experience of emotional stress, children show less cardiovascular arousal during everyday family interactions (dinnertime). It is possible that it can be physiologically soothing when parents make their children feel safe about expressing emotional distress (anger and sadness). Interventions by healthcare providers that teach parents how to coach their children about emotions and comfort them in emotionally stressful times may have implications for children's health and well-being. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health (MH42484).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Psychophysiology of Family Process and Health: Parenting Behaviors and Children's Physiological Stressen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158136-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Psychophysiology of Family Process and Health: Parenting Behaviors and Children's Physiological Stress</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowie, Bonnie, RN, MSN, MBA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 358736, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-543-2969</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bonbowie@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Chelsea Siler, L. Charmaine Barga, Cheryl Beardslee, Sybil CarrFre</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This research looks at the associations between children's reports about their emotions and their parents' help during emotionally stressful times with children's cardiovascular measures of stress during a dinnertime home visit. Rationale: Children's ability to regulate their emotional responses to stressful situations is associated with health outcomes. Parenting behaviors that helps children learn how to emotionally and physiologically soothe themselves during stressful times is also associated with health outcomes for children. This study assesses the role of parenting behaviors in children's emotional experience and physiological stress. Methods: Children in middle childhood (6-11 years old) were interviewed about their experience of anger and sadness and about their parents' role in helping them with those emotions. The children's ambulatory electrocardiogram measures were taken during a family dinnertime session in the home using Spacelabs Holter Monitors. Cardiovascular measures of general autonomic arousal (interbeat interval, IBI) and parasympathetic influence on the heart (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) were used to measure physiological stress in the children. Results: Children's self-reports of intensity and frequency of difficult emotions (anger and sadness) were not correlated with IBI or RSA for the children during the family dinner session in the home. The associations between the children's cardiovascular measures and the likelihood of going to either their mothers or fathers during emotionally stressful times were also not significant. However, the children who reported that their parents were understanding and comforting about their emotions of sadness and anger showed lower autonomic cardiovascular arousal during the family dinner session in the home (-226, indicating a longer time period between heart beats).Implications: When children perceive that their parents understand their experience of emotional stress, children show less cardiovascular arousal during everyday family interactions (dinnertime). It is possible that it can be physiologically soothing when parents make their children feel safe about expressing emotional distress (anger and sadness). Interventions by healthcare providers that teach parents how to coach their children about emotions and comfort them in emotionally stressful times may have implications for children's health and well-being. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health (MH42484).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.