2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158137
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Survey of First Job Experiences of Recent RN Graduates
Abstract:
A Survey of First Job Experiences of Recent RN Graduates
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bowles, Cheryl, RN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Las Vegas School of Nursing - Box 453018, 4505 Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA
Contact Telephone:702-895-3082
Co-Authors:Lori Candela
Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine what choices recent graduate RN's made for their first nursing position, perceptions of this experience, how long they stayed in that first position, and if they left the position, why. Background: In spite of numerous studies that address job perceptions of nurses, much less is known about the newest members of the profession; those who have been in practice five years or less. Little is known about whether or not we are keeping new nurses in the hospital settings, or whether we are losing them as fast as they are coming out of the nursing schools. Is it possible that hospitals are acting as a revolving door; that as fast as new graduates enter as a hospital employee, they exit, choosing to work in other non-hospital environments, or leaving nursing altogether? Nurses with negative perceptions of first job experiences may soon leave the position, thus doing little to alleviate staffing shortages and wasting precious recruitment and orientation resources. Therefore it is important to understand how recent RN graduates view their first job. Methods: A descriptive survey design was chosen for this study using a questionnaire developed by the researchers to survey perceptions of recent graduate nurses registered in the state of Nevada regarding their first nursing position. Data collection was conducted over a 3 month period. The Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of First Job Experience was mailed to 3077 RN's licensed in Nevada who graduated from their basic nursing program within the last 5 years. Completed surveys were received from 352 respondents. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and perception responses. ANOVA and t tests were used to compare total scores with selected demographic variables. Results: Thirty eight percent of the respondents first worked in a medical-surgical area. Other respondents indicated they took positions in numerous areas which were inpatient hospital settings (55%) with the most common area being intensive care (11%). Only 7% took positions in out-patient, office or community health setting. This sample of recent RN graduates showed a rate of leaving their first position far above the reported turnover rate for all RNs. Thirty percent of respondents had left within one year and 57% had left by 2 years. Content analysis of factors affecting decisions to leave the first job revealed that patient care issues, such as unsafe nurse-patient ratios, were perceived as the most negative aspects and the most frequent reason for leaving. Cronbach alpha reliability assessment of the survey tool was .89 for this sample and following factor analysis, 6 major themes were identified regarding perception of the first nursing position. Implications: Data from this sample of recent RN graduates suggests important considerations for hospital and nursing administrators. These include the importance of reducing workloads of nurses and the need for empowerment of nurses in the workplace. This sample reflects the larger RN population in their dissatisfaction with the working environment, their major concern with patient safety, their level of stress in their job and their frustration with the lack of administrative response to these issues. Administrators must be more cognizant of, and responsive to, the enormous transition that new nurse graduates face as they enter the work force. The findings support the need for hospitals to place a much more significant effort on improving the work conditions for nurses if there is any hope of effectively improving the retention rates of recent RN graduates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Survey of First Job Experiences of Recent RN Graduatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158137-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Survey of First Job Experiences of Recent RN Graduates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowles, Cheryl, RN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Las Vegas School of Nursing - Box 453018, 4505 Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV, 89154-3018, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">702-895-3082</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bowles@ccmail.nevada.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lori Candela</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose and Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine what choices recent graduate RN's made for their first nursing position, perceptions of this experience, how long they stayed in that first position, and if they left the position, why. Background: In spite of numerous studies that address job perceptions of nurses, much less is known about the newest members of the profession; those who have been in practice five years or less. Little is known about whether or not we are keeping new nurses in the hospital settings, or whether we are losing them as fast as they are coming out of the nursing schools. Is it possible that hospitals are acting as a revolving door; that as fast as new graduates enter as a hospital employee, they exit, choosing to work in other non-hospital environments, or leaving nursing altogether? Nurses with negative perceptions of first job experiences may soon leave the position, thus doing little to alleviate staffing shortages and wasting precious recruitment and orientation resources. Therefore it is important to understand how recent RN graduates view their first job. Methods: A descriptive survey design was chosen for this study using a questionnaire developed by the researchers to survey perceptions of recent graduate nurses registered in the state of Nevada regarding their first nursing position. Data collection was conducted over a 3 month period. The Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of First Job Experience was mailed to 3077 RN's licensed in Nevada who graduated from their basic nursing program within the last 5 years. Completed surveys were received from 352 respondents. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample and perception responses. ANOVA and t tests were used to compare total scores with selected demographic variables. Results: Thirty eight percent of the respondents first worked in a medical-surgical area. Other respondents indicated they took positions in numerous areas which were inpatient hospital settings (55%) with the most common area being intensive care (11%). Only 7% took positions in out-patient, office or community health setting. This sample of recent RN graduates showed a rate of leaving their first position far above the reported turnover rate for all RNs. Thirty percent of respondents had left within one year and 57% had left by 2 years. Content analysis of factors affecting decisions to leave the first job revealed that patient care issues, such as unsafe nurse-patient ratios, were perceived as the most negative aspects and the most frequent reason for leaving. Cronbach alpha reliability assessment of the survey tool was .89 for this sample and following factor analysis, 6 major themes were identified regarding perception of the first nursing position. Implications: Data from this sample of recent RN graduates suggests important considerations for hospital and nursing administrators. These include the importance of reducing workloads of nurses and the need for empowerment of nurses in the workplace. This sample reflects the larger RN population in their dissatisfaction with the working environment, their major concern with patient safety, their level of stress in their job and their frustration with the lack of administrative response to these issues. Administrators must be more cognizant of, and responsive to, the enormous transition that new nurse graduates face as they enter the work force. The findings support the need for hospitals to place a much more significant effort on improving the work conditions for nurses if there is any hope of effectively improving the retention rates of recent RN graduates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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