2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158138
Type:
Presentation
Title:
School Age Children's Narratives and Maternal Breast Cancer
Abstract:
School Age Children's Narratives and Maternal Breast Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brandt, Patricia (Patti), PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington - School of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:3917 University Way NE - Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA
Contact Telephone:206-685-1291
Co-Authors:Sallie Kirsch, Susan Casey
The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of story narratives for understanding the school age child's experiences with maternal breast cancer. A narrative framework is oriented to the meaning of one's experience and not the reality of the experience. A structured story stem is developed around a dilemma the child is likely to encounter in a specific context. These story narratives were developed as a means of improving the sensitivity and specificity of a study outcome for the measurement model of a multi-state intervention study. Preliminary results had indicated that significant changes were not found on the relationship questionnaire completed by the child due to limited variability of the scores. For this feasibility study, there were 16 children with 6 males and 10 females aged 8 to 13 years. Seven children were in families randomized to receive the phone intervention and nine children were in the home intervention. Each intervention was directed to enhancing the mother's communication with her child. Method: The six story stems were developed from the common dilemmas children identified on a pretest measure from the multi-state intervention. Sixteen children whose mothers were in the initial treatment phase of breast cancer were administered the story stems. The transcribed interview data were analyzed using two methods: content analysis using the inductive coding method and an established scoring system using the MacArthur Narrative Coding Manual. Coding decisions were based on 100% consensus between two nurse researchers. Results: The inductive coding method produced 10 conceptual domains: (child) connecting with mother, responding to mother's cancer, responding to the situation, engaging in normalizing activities, feeling apprehensive about the present, and sensing a future; (mother) responding to the cancer and connecting with child and (friend) responding to the situation. Coding results using the MacArthur Narrative Coding approach indicated that there was a similar frequency of the dominant themes in the story stems and the % of positive final story content for children in each intervention. Moral conflict, avoidant and empathic responses were more dominant than aggression or interpersonal tension responses. Research implications: Story narratives provide an effective method for eliciting the child's relational experiences. The information obtained is relevant for outcome-related studies and for designing treatments directed to the child's experiences in a difficult life context such as breast cancer. Story narratives are also valuable for case study approaches. Funded by RIFP @ the University of Washington School of Nursing: Susan G. Komen Foundation Puget Sound Affiliate Women's Health Research; NIWR, NIH, (R01 CA 78424) Helping the Mother with Breast Cancer Support her Child.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSchool Age Children's Narratives and Maternal Breast Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158138-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">School Age Children's Narratives and Maternal Breast Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brandt, Patricia (Patti), PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington - School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3917 University Way NE - Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206-685-1291</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbrandt@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sallie Kirsch, Susan Casey</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of story narratives for understanding the school age child's experiences with maternal breast cancer. A narrative framework is oriented to the meaning of one's experience and not the reality of the experience. A structured story stem is developed around a dilemma the child is likely to encounter in a specific context. These story narratives were developed as a means of improving the sensitivity and specificity of a study outcome for the measurement model of a multi-state intervention study. Preliminary results had indicated that significant changes were not found on the relationship questionnaire completed by the child due to limited variability of the scores. For this feasibility study, there were 16 children with 6 males and 10 females aged 8 to 13 years. Seven children were in families randomized to receive the phone intervention and nine children were in the home intervention. Each intervention was directed to enhancing the mother's communication with her child. Method: The six story stems were developed from the common dilemmas children identified on a pretest measure from the multi-state intervention. Sixteen children whose mothers were in the initial treatment phase of breast cancer were administered the story stems. The transcribed interview data were analyzed using two methods: content analysis using the inductive coding method and an established scoring system using the MacArthur Narrative Coding Manual. Coding decisions were based on 100% consensus between two nurse researchers. Results: The inductive coding method produced 10 conceptual domains: (child) connecting with mother, responding to mother's cancer, responding to the situation, engaging in normalizing activities, feeling apprehensive about the present, and sensing a future; (mother) responding to the cancer and connecting with child and (friend) responding to the situation. Coding results using the MacArthur Narrative Coding approach indicated that there was a similar frequency of the dominant themes in the story stems and the % of positive final story content for children in each intervention. Moral conflict, avoidant and empathic responses were more dominant than aggression or interpersonal tension responses. Research implications: Story narratives provide an effective method for eliciting the child's relational experiences. The information obtained is relevant for outcome-related studies and for designing treatments directed to the child's experiences in a difficult life context such as breast cancer. Story narratives are also valuable for case study approaches. Funded by RIFP @ the University of Washington School of Nursing: Susan G. Komen Foundation Puget Sound Affiliate Women's Health Research; NIWR, NIH, (R01 CA 78424) Helping the Mother with Breast Cancer Support her Child.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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