2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158139
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Addressing the Needs of Adjunct Nursing Faculty
Abstract:
Addressing the Needs of Adjunct Nursing Faculty
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Butell, Sue, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Linfield College - Portland Campus School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:2255 NW Northrup, Portland, OR, 97210, USA
Contact Telephone:503-413-7177
Co-Authors:Barbara A. May, Jana Taylor
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive research study was to: 1) examine the experiences of adjunct nursing faculty, 2) determine how well their needs were being met, and 3) identify strategies that would help recruit and retain adjunct faculty. Background: The nursing shortage has not only impacted health care settings, but also schools of nursing. The Oregon State Board of Nursing has asked all schools of nursing to increase enrollment up to 50% in order to respond to the nursing shortage. Increasing student enrollment poses numerous issues but paramount is the need for well-qualified nursing faculty. Reliance on adjunct nursing faculty to teach primarily in the clinical setting is growing rapidly in schools of nursing across the country. In this school of nursing, course coordinators are overwhelmed with the hiring, supervising, and evaluating of adjunct faculty who come with varied clinical and teaching experiences. Anecdotal student comments about adjunct faculty are not always favorable and they are often scapegoated for their lack of teaching expertise. Three years ago, this school of nursing began offering annual adjunct faculty workshops. Given the feedback from participants at these workshops, the researchers began to wonder about the experiences and needs of adjunct faculty. Sample: A total of 19 adjunct faculty participated in focus group interviews. The cross-sectional sample was recruited from a list of adjunct faculty who taught at least one semester in the 2003-2004 academic year. Two groups were formed (N=9 +N=10). Methods: The researchers used a qualitative focus group research design to interview a cross-section of adjunct nursing faculty. Two-hour interviews were conducted using a standard protocol facilitator guide consisting of ten questions covering a range of topics such as the positive and challenging aspects of teaching, the support needed, curricular knowledge, and financial compensation. Interviews were tape recorded, professionally transcribed, and reviewed for themes. Results: Findings indicated that, although adjunct faculty felt positively about many aspects of their work, common themes of challenging issues arose. These included teaching strategies, grading papers, failing students, motivating students, and the time commitment. Implications: With today's faculty shortage, nursing deans and faculty must be aware of the needs of adjunct faculty who are experts in the clinical arena but often lack teaching expertise. These findings will be used in campus strategic planning to increase recruitment and retention of adjunct faculty. Strategies to be considered include the mentoring of nursing adjuncts through regular team meetings and course coordinator support as well as on-going educational offerings with "how to teach" topics as a focus. A follow-up study is planned to determine if the implemented strategies improved retention of adjunct faculty and quality of adjunct teaching. Funding Support: A Linfield College Professional Development Grant funded this research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAddressing the Needs of Adjunct Nursing Facultyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158139-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Addressing the Needs of Adjunct Nursing Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butell, Sue, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Linfield College - Portland Campus School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2255 NW Northrup, Portland, OR, 97210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">503-413-7177</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sbutell@linfield.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara A. May, Jana Taylor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive research study was to: 1) examine the experiences of adjunct nursing faculty, 2) determine how well their needs were being met, and 3) identify strategies that would help recruit and retain adjunct faculty. Background: The nursing shortage has not only impacted health care settings, but also schools of nursing. The Oregon State Board of Nursing has asked all schools of nursing to increase enrollment up to 50% in order to respond to the nursing shortage. Increasing student enrollment poses numerous issues but paramount is the need for well-qualified nursing faculty. Reliance on adjunct nursing faculty to teach primarily in the clinical setting is growing rapidly in schools of nursing across the country. In this school of nursing, course coordinators are overwhelmed with the hiring, supervising, and evaluating of adjunct faculty who come with varied clinical and teaching experiences. Anecdotal student comments about adjunct faculty are not always favorable and they are often scapegoated for their lack of teaching expertise. Three years ago, this school of nursing began offering annual adjunct faculty workshops. Given the feedback from participants at these workshops, the researchers began to wonder about the experiences and needs of adjunct faculty. Sample: A total of 19 adjunct faculty participated in focus group interviews. The cross-sectional sample was recruited from a list of adjunct faculty who taught at least one semester in the 2003-2004 academic year. Two groups were formed (N=9 +N=10). Methods: The researchers used a qualitative focus group research design to interview a cross-section of adjunct nursing faculty. Two-hour interviews were conducted using a standard protocol facilitator guide consisting of ten questions covering a range of topics such as the positive and challenging aspects of teaching, the support needed, curricular knowledge, and financial compensation. Interviews were tape recorded, professionally transcribed, and reviewed for themes. Results: Findings indicated that, although adjunct faculty felt positively about many aspects of their work, common themes of challenging issues arose. These included teaching strategies, grading papers, failing students, motivating students, and the time commitment. Implications: With today's faculty shortage, nursing deans and faculty must be aware of the needs of adjunct faculty who are experts in the clinical arena but often lack teaching expertise. These findings will be used in campus strategic planning to increase recruitment and retention of adjunct faculty. Strategies to be considered include the mentoring of nursing adjuncts through regular team meetings and course coordinator support as well as on-going educational offerings with &quot;how to teach&quot; topics as a focus. A follow-up study is planned to determine if the implemented strategies improved retention of adjunct faculty and quality of adjunct teaching. Funding Support: A Linfield College Professional Development Grant funded this research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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