2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158140
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making a Choice: The Process of Maintaining or Changing the Birth Plan
Abstract:
Making a Choice: The Process of Maintaining or Changing the Birth Plan
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2005
Author:Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:2525 North 860, East Provo, UT, 84604-4082, USA
Contact Telephone:801-422-3227
Co-Authors:Troy W. Carlton
Purpose/Aims: Giving birth is a powerful life event leaving a lasting impact on the childbearing woman. While birth is universal in nature, each woman's birth experience is different. Birth preferences may include no preferences, medicated, non-medicated, or "wait and see," meaning that the decision will be made during labor. There is a body of literature on the perceptions of women about childbirth, but no qualitative studies could be found which identified the process of women changing their birth preference. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors which contribute to women maintaining or changing their birth preferences. Rationale/Background: Birth can leave a lasting impact, either positive or negative, depending on women's perceptions of their experience. While clinicians may not view the birth as negative, the experience may be perceived so by the woman herself (Beck, 2004). Decades after giving birth, women's memories are still vivid and deeply felt. Women reported positive birth experiences when they felt in control, when communication with clinicians was effective, when decision making power was shared, and when women felt supported, valued and treated with respect by their caregivers. In addition, women reporting the highest levels of long-term satisfaction with their birth experience felt giving birth contributed to enhancing their sense of self-efficacy. Supporting a woman's birthing preference is an important key to a woman's satisfaction with her birth experience. In our clinical observations, we have witnessed women who have expressed their birth preference, yet have changed that preference once they were in active labor. Questions have emerged as to what factors influence this change in birth preference, the process women go through, and what if any impact it has on satisfaction with giving birth. Methods: A purposive sample of twenty (20) women who had recently given birth in one of three birthing units in the western mountain United States participated in the study. Women who indicated upon admission to the birthing unit that their birth preference was either "un-medicated" or classified themselves as "wait and see" who later changed their preference were included. Audio taped interviews conducted within three months of giving birth were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis in conjunction with a continuing review of the literature. Field notes, member checks, and further theoretical sampling with women who did not change their birth plans contributed to the trustworthiness of the data. Results: Themes included wanting an un-medicated birth, changing to a medicated birth, feeling disappointed, ambivalent, or satisfied; and reconsidering the change. The pivotal role of the nurse was also articulated. Practice patterns such as high rate of induction, timing and amount of epidural anesthesia, and other covert processes by nurses and other clinicians influenced birth preferences and perceptions of a positive birth experience. Implications: Nurses and other clinicians must provide a high level of supportive surveillance, respecting women's decisions if the birth is to be perceived as positive. Informing women of their options, actively assisting them with non-pharmacologic coping strategies, and discussing the risks and benefits of analgesia/anesthesia are helpful in supporting their choices. Building confidence in the woman's ability to accomplish her goals for giving birth is an essential nursing intervention. Understanding and appreciating the woman as an individual and celebrating birth will contribute to a positive birthing experience and subsequent psychosocial outcomes for the woman and the childbearing family.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking a Choice: The Process of Maintaining or Changing the Birth Planen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158140-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Making a Choice: The Process of Maintaining or Changing the Birth Plan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2525 North 860, East Provo, UT, 84604-4082, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801-422-3227</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Troy W. Carlton</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose/Aims: Giving birth is a powerful life event leaving a lasting impact on the childbearing woman. While birth is universal in nature, each woman's birth experience is different. Birth preferences may include no preferences, medicated, non-medicated, or &quot;wait and see,&quot; meaning that the decision will be made during labor. There is a body of literature on the perceptions of women about childbirth, but no qualitative studies could be found which identified the process of women changing their birth preference. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors which contribute to women maintaining or changing their birth preferences. Rationale/Background: Birth can leave a lasting impact, either positive or negative, depending on women's perceptions of their experience. While clinicians may not view the birth as negative, the experience may be perceived so by the woman herself (Beck, 2004). Decades after giving birth, women's memories are still vivid and deeply felt. Women reported positive birth experiences when they felt in control, when communication with clinicians was effective, when decision making power was shared, and when women felt supported, valued and treated with respect by their caregivers. In addition, women reporting the highest levels of long-term satisfaction with their birth experience felt giving birth contributed to enhancing their sense of self-efficacy. Supporting a woman's birthing preference is an important key to a woman's satisfaction with her birth experience. In our clinical observations, we have witnessed women who have expressed their birth preference, yet have changed that preference once they were in active labor. Questions have emerged as to what factors influence this change in birth preference, the process women go through, and what if any impact it has on satisfaction with giving birth. Methods: A purposive sample of twenty (20) women who had recently given birth in one of three birthing units in the western mountain United States participated in the study. Women who indicated upon admission to the birthing unit that their birth preference was either &quot;un-medicated&quot; or classified themselves as &quot;wait and see&quot; who later changed their preference were included. Audio taped interviews conducted within three months of giving birth were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis in conjunction with a continuing review of the literature. Field notes, member checks, and further theoretical sampling with women who did not change their birth plans contributed to the trustworthiness of the data. Results: Themes included wanting an un-medicated birth, changing to a medicated birth, feeling disappointed, ambivalent, or satisfied; and reconsidering the change. The pivotal role of the nurse was also articulated. Practice patterns such as high rate of induction, timing and amount of epidural anesthesia, and other covert processes by nurses and other clinicians influenced birth preferences and perceptions of a positive birth experience. Implications: Nurses and other clinicians must provide a high level of supportive surveillance, respecting women's decisions if the birth is to be perceived as positive. Informing women of their options, actively assisting them with non-pharmacologic coping strategies, and discussing the risks and benefits of analgesia/anesthesia are helpful in supporting their choices. Building confidence in the woman's ability to accomplish her goals for giving birth is an essential nursing intervention. Understanding and appreciating the woman as an individual and celebrating birth will contribute to a positive birthing experience and subsequent psychosocial outcomes for the woman and the childbearing family.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:32:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:32:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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